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Tulsa Habitat for Humanity terms its new style of house the “Lortondale style,” named for the mid-century modern architecture of Tulsa’s Lortondale neighborhood located near East 31st Street and South Yale Avenue.

You might begin to see a new sort of house crop up around town in the coming months. Tulsa Habitat for Humanity is producing six panel homes in the Crutchfield neighborhood, which spans North Utica and Peoria avenues just north of Interstate 244.

THFH terms its new style of house the “Lortondale style,” named for the mid-century modern architecture of Tulsa’s Lortondale neighborhood located near East 31st Street and South Yale Avenue.

Also modern are the materials and process used to build the new homes. A local manufacturer of building supplies, Standard Panel, provides the homes’ material — panels made of a strong fiberglass composite — and THFH puts the pieces in place.

Not only do these panels make construction easier, but they lower utility costs for families who are already struggling.

THFH already used construction methods that lent themselves to energy efficiency, but as CEO Cameron Walker says, “These panel homes are on a completely different level.” He says THFH aims to have six of these houses built by early 2020.

Editorial Intern

Ethan Veenker is from Tulsa, Oklahoma. He will graduate from the University of Tulsa in May 2020 with two degrees in English and creative writing. When not writing or reading, he likes to drum. This annoys his neighbors.

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