Remembering 3 Brave Medal Of Honor Recipients

Hometown heroes Albert Schwab, Ernest Childers and Donald Sloat served their country honorably.



About the Medal of Honor

The Medal of Honor is the highest award for valor in action against an enemy force that can be bestowed upon an individual serving in the Armed Services of the United States. It is generally presented to its recipient by the president in the name of Congress.  On July 12, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed a bill creating the Medal of Honor. At that time, 88 soldiers had already performed heroic actions that would earn them the Medal of Honor. The earliest action that garnered a recognition was by Army Surgeon Bernard J.D. Irwin who over Feb. 13-14, 1861, in present-day Arizona, voluntarily led a command of troops to relieve a surrounded detachment of the 7th Infantry. He was awarded the medal in 1894, 30 years after his deed. The first to wear the medal was Pvt. Jacob Parrott for his actions with others in the “Great Locomotive Chase” in April 1862.  Of the 3,503 recipients, 72 are living, only one has been a woman and 19 are double recipients.

The Medal of Honor is the highest award for valor in action against an enemy force that can be bestowed upon an individual serving in the Armed Services of the United States. It is generally presented to its recipient by the president in the name of Congress.

On July 12, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed a bill creating the Medal of Honor. At that time, 88 soldiers had already performed heroic actions that would earn them the Medal of Honor. The earliest action that garnered a recognition was by Army Surgeon Bernard J.D. Irwin who over Feb. 13-14, 1861, in present-day Arizona, voluntarily led a command of troops to relieve a surrounded detachment of the 7th Infantry. He was awarded the medal in 1894, 30 years after his deed. The first to wear the medal was Pvt. Jacob Parrott for his actions with others in the “Great Locomotive Chase” in April 1862.

Of the 3,503 recipients, 72 are living, only one has been a woman and 19 are double recipients.

Source: Congressional Medal of Honor Society

 

Pfc. Albert Schwab

Albert Schwab  1920-1945  Service Branch: Marine Corps Hometown: Tulsa Conflict: WWII, Pacific Theater, Okinawa Medal of Honor Received:  For action on May 7, 1945 Named in his honor: Albert E. Schwab Hall at Tulsa International Airport; Camp Schwab Okinawa Citation Excerpt: His aggressive initiative, outstanding valor and professional skill throughout the bitter conflict sustain and enhance the highest traditions of U.S.  Naval Service.

Albert Schwab didn’t have to go to war.

The Central High School graduate was married, and had a young family and a good job working in the oil fields. By 1944, the tide of World War II was turning decisively in favor of the Allies against the Axis powers. And, though hard fighting still lay ahead, Schwab probably could have sat out the rest of the war.

But he didn’t.

Instead, in the spring of ’44, he volunteered for the Marine Corps with a friend named Tom Nickle, who would marry Albert’s sister, Katie.

George Nickle of Greenville, Kentucky, is Tom’s son and Albert’s nephew. A retired Navy and Marine Corps Chaplain, Nickle recalls the last time he saw his Uncle Albert.

“He and my dad came home on leave after boot camp in the summer of ’44,” Nickle says. “We had a family picnic at a park in Tulsa. I remember them carrying a watermelon in a washtub with ice.”

Schwab with his wife, Kay, and son, Steven, before his deployment.

Of the two men, only Tom was destined to make it safely home.

Family lore suggests Albert was an athletic young man with a cheerful disposition, zest for life and a bit of daredevil in him. According to Nickle, Albert and some friends once created a homemade diving helmet. Albert volunteered to put it on and jump into the Arkansas River.

“It didn’t work out too well for him. I think he nearly drowned,” Nickle says. “Those are the kind of stories Mom would tell me about her brother.”

Albert’s siblings adored their older brother, says another nephew, Tulsan Jim Carlson. He is the son of Jo Ann Schwab, one of Albert’s younger sisters.

“Albert was my mom’s hero even before he went off to war,” says Carlson, the owner of Carlson Co., a manufacturer of steel flanges for the oil and gas industry, where he keeps pictures of his uncle on display.

As American forces advanced across the Pacific, Japanese resistance became fanatical, with most soldiers choosing to fight to the death rather than surrender.
The savage combat reached a bloody climax in the spring of 1945 when U.S. forces invaded Okinawa, a battle that claimed the lives of more than 12,000 U.S. servicemen, about 90,000 Japanese combatants and up to 150,000 civilians, according to the National World War II Museum. It was into this maelstrom that Pfc. Albert Schwab was thrown in May 1945.

As one of the bigger men in H (Headquarters) Company, Schwab carried a flamethrower, a bulky, 75-pound weapon that was used to clear bunkers and caves of last-ditch holdouts. On May 7, 1945, Schwab’s unit was pinned down by enemy machine-gun fire. Unable to outflank the enemy due to terrain and with his comrades taking heavy casualties, Schwab charged uphill by himself against heavy fire, unleashing streams of fire that wiped out multiple enemy positions.

During the fight, Schwab took a fatal bullet wound to his left hip.

“He was a hero,” Nickle says. “But he was also a Marine, and Marines are taught to achieve an objective and carry out their mission. Part of what he was doing that day was his job. It cost him his life, but he helped achieve the objective.”

For his gallantry, Schwab received the Medal of Honor, presented posthumously on Memorial Day 1946 at Veterans Park (formerly Boulder Park) in Tulsa.

Part of his Medal of Honor citation reads: “Cool and indomitable, he moved forward in the face of a direct concentration of hostile fire, relentlessly closed the enemy position and attacked.”

His name lives on at Camp Schwab, a Marine base in Okinawa, as well as here in Tulsa where the local Marine Corps League Detachment is named after him. In 2011, the Marine Corps League spearheaded, with family support, the creation of a sculpture of Schwab that was placed in the central hall at Tulsa International Airport, now officially called Albert E. Schwab Hall.

A statue of Pfc. Albert Schwab resides in his namesake hall at Tulsa International Airport.

The statue isn’t of Schwab alone. Rather, it shows him embracing his younger sister, Jo Ann, (Carlson’s mother) in a bittersweet farewell, recalling the brief furlough before he shipped out to his fate in the Pacific. Though in failing health, Jo Ann lived long enough to see a dream fulfilled — her brother honored with a sculpture. When the curtain dropped at the dedication ceremony, something remarkable happened.

“She rose out of her wheelchair and walked toward the statue and stared at it,” Carlson recounts. “She was clearly moved. It was her brother.”

Schwab remains Tulsa’s only Medal of Honor recipient.

Albert Schwab

1920-1945

Service Branch: Marine Corps

Hometown: Tulsa

Conflict: WWII, Pacific Theater, Okinawa

Medal of Honor Received: For action on May 7, 1945

Named in his honor: Albert E. Schwab Hall at Tulsa International Airport; Camp Schwab Okinawa

Citation Excerpt: His aggressive initiative, outstanding valor and professional skill throughout the bitter conflict sustain and enhance the highest traditions of U.S. Naval Service.

 

Lt. Col. Ernest Childers

Ernest Childers  1918-2005  Service Branch: U.S. Army     Hometown: Broken Arrow     Conflict: WWII, European Theater, Italy Medal of Honor Received: For gallantry in action on Sept. 22, 1943 Named in his honor: Ernest Childers Middle School, Broken Arrow; Ernest Childers VA Outpatient Clinic, Tulsa Citation Excerpt: The exceptional leadership, initiative, calmness under fire, and conspicuous gallantry  displayed by 2nd Lt. Childers were an inspiration to his men.

Heroes, hunters and athletes often display their trophies for all to see and admire.

Ernest Childers did not.

A Medal of Honor recipient, Childers kept the nation’s highest military honor tucked away in a drawer in his Broken Arrow home.

“The medal never came out — ever,” says his daughter, Elaine Childers, a retired special education teacher. “It was not a topic of conversation.”

And for decades after World War II, Childers’ actions on the battlefield would remain a closed subject, not uncommon for soldiers of that, or perhaps any, era.

Childers was an honest, humble, hard-working man who grew up poor on a subsistence farm. A boy of Creek Indian heritage, he shot squirrels and other critters to help feed his family.

“He had a .22 rifle with one bullet, and he had to go out on Thanksgiving to get a rabbit for his family,” says Elaine, recounting a family tale. “He saw a couple of rabbits and wanted to get both, so he positioned himself to hit them with a single shot, and he did and that’s what they had for Thanksgiving. He really perfected his marksmanship as a kid, and that served him well later on.”

Childers with President Franklin D. Roosevelt

As a young man prior to the war, Childers joined the Oklahoma National Guard to earn extra money. After the U.S. entered the conflict, he became part of the famed 45th Infantry Division. His unit saw action in North Africa and Sicily before landing in Italy.

It was on Sept. 22, 1943, that then 2nd Lt. Childers distinguished himself in combat on the rugged countryside around Oliveto, Italy. The Germans were firing down on Childers’ men from the hill above, inflicting heavy casualties.

“He was seeing his friends, men he knew well, getting killed,” Elaine Childers says. “It made him angry.”

It was that anger that motivated Childers, in spite of a fractured instep, to singlehandedly advance himself uphill to engage the Germans. Childers first eliminated two enemy snipers in a nearby farmhouse and then crawled up to an enemy machine gun nest, wiping out its occupants. Still under fire and nearly out of ammo, he tossed a rock at a second German machine gun nest. Thinking it was a grenade, the Germans jumped out and exposed themselves to deadly fire. Continuing his assault, Childers then captured an enemy mortar observer, who had helped rain death on his comrades. Part of the Medal of Honor citation reads:

“The exceptional leadership, initiative, calmness under fire and conspicuous gallantry displayed by 2nd Lt. Childers were an inspiration to his men.”

Childers with President John F. Kennedy

For his actions that day, Childers became the first Native American to receive the Medal of Honor during WWII in the European Theater.

Childers received numerous other citations stemming from his actions during the war, and he continued his distinguished military career before retiring as a lieutenant colonel in 1965. It wasn’t until after his military retirement, during a return trip to the site of the action in Italy, that he finally began talking about his role in the war with friends and family.

“I believe that was when he laid those ghosts to rest,” Elaine Childers says. “After his return visit, it was like he let go and could talk about it.”

However, one thing never changed. He refused to glorify war and disliked war films that simply couldn’t depict the hell that war really is.

“To him, war was not romantic or fun,” Elaine says. “It was bloody, cold and wet. It was hunger and the horror of seeing your friends die.”

In his long lifetime, Childers became a Broken Arrow hometown legend. In the 1970s, he and his friend, Clarence G. Oliver Jr., helped to organize a Broken Arrow parade honoring America’s Medal of Honor recipients. Over 300 recipients attended.

Oliver, who served as Broken Arrow Schools superintendent for 18 years, saw to it in the 1980s that a new middle school was named after Childers. By the mid-1990s, a statue of Childers was erected in Veteran’s Park on Broken Arrow’s Main Street. Childers was reluctant about having a statue of him erected, and Oliver made five trips as an emissary to get Childers’ permission.

Childers’ statue at Broken Arrow’s Veteran’s Park

“He was just a humble, gracious man, but he finally agreed on a few conditions,” Oliver recounts. “One of the conditions was that he didn’t want to be depicted with a weapon and another was to make sure the pigeon droppings would be cleaned off.”

Broken Arrow continues to remember Childers with a display in the Broken Arrow Museum. And that medal that once resided in a drawer? It is now displayed at First National Bank in Broken Arrow.

“Daddy was such a dignified, honorable man,” Elaine Childers adds. “He had a love of this country that you could not believe.”

Ernest Childers

1918-2005

Service Branch: U.S. Army    

Hometown: Broken Arrow    

Conflict: WWII, European Theater, Italy

Medal of Honor Received: For gallantry in action on Sept. 22, 1943

Named in his honor: Ernest Childers Middle School, Broken Arrow; Ernest Childers VA Outpatient Clinic, Tulsa

Citation Excerpt: The exceptional leadership, initiative, calmness under fire, and conspicuous gallantry displayed by 2nd Lt. Childers were an inspiration to his men.

 

Specialist Four Donald Sloat

Donald Sloat  1949-1970  Service Branch: U.S. Army Hometown: Coweta Conflict: Vietnam Medal of Honor Received: For heroism in action on Jan. 17, 1970 Named in his honor: Donald P. Sloat Junior High School, Coweta Citation Excerpt: Sloat distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty.

It took nearly 45 years for Army Specialist Four, Donald P. Sloat of Coweta, to receive the Medal of Honor for his self-sacrificing valor in Vietnam.

Somehow in the fog of war and its traumatic aftermath, Sloat’s actions that fateful January day in 1970 were lost in time.

But not forever.

His family had been told that Sloat stepped on a landmine. However, decades later, a relative came across an alternative account of Sloat’s death that sparked a quest to find the truth.

That quest was led by Sloat’s late mother, Evelyn, who was determined to see her son properly honored for his service and sacrifice. With help from determined members of Sloat’s former unit and others, the story of what happened was painstakingly pieced together and three eyewitnesses to Sloat’s heroism were tracked down.

Sloat was just another young man who chose to serve, enlisting in the Army in 1969. He probably didn’t have to at that point as he was a student at Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College. But he came from Coweta, a patriotic town of 2,500 that had seen more than its share of heartache from the Vietnam War. Several young Coweta men died in Vietnam, including three others from Sloat’s high school class of ’67.

Specialist Donald Sloat was awarded the Bronze Star for valor, along with other commendations, before he died on Jan. 17, 1970, shielding fellow soldiers from an exploding grenade. He later received the Medal of Honor.

Ultimately, Coweta would suffer perhaps more than any other small-town community in the U.S., losing a total of eight men, including Sloat, to the war.

Cowetan Dee Wilson, a two-tour Vietnam veteran and officer in the Coweta American Legion Post 226, says the young men of that era, like Sloat, wanted to serve their country.

“Coweta was a small, very patriotic town,” Wilson says. “We all wanted to serve and do our part. We were raised to serve and to love our country.”

Though a few years older, Wilson attended school with Sloat and remembers a robust, likeable and athletic young man. “He was a big boy, strong and in good shape. I played sports with him. He was very outgoing.”

Sloat went on to college and played football there. But a couple years in, he felt the call of his country. He and a classmate signed up for the Army … and Vietnam.

By all accounts, Sloat excelled as a machine-gunner. Before his final action, he already had been awarded the Bronze Star for valor along with other commendations.

However, it was what he did on Jan. 17, 1970, that made him an American hero for all time. As his unit moved through the area, they came under fire; a soldier near Sloat tripped a booby trap and a grenade came rolling downhill. Quickly, Sloat picked up the grenade with the intent of throwing it but realized he was surrounded by comrades. To throw the grenade would likely mean killing his fellow soldiers. Instead, Sloat pulled the grenade into his torso and doubled himself over as it exploded.

“I was only 5 to 8 feet behind Don when the grenade went off. His act saved my life.” Those were the words of Pfc. DeWayne Lewis Jr., who was on patrol with Sloat and one of the three required witnesses to Sloat’s heroic act.

No other soldiers were killed by the explosion, thanks to Sloat.

“I’m proud to be his sister,” says Kathy Ahlstrom, who was 5 when he died. Her lasting memory of her much older brother is of him carrying her around on his shoulders, which he did the day he left for Vietnam. “To do what he did, without hesitation, to save the lives of the men in his platoon speaks volumes about the kind of man he was.”

Even today, Sloat’s other sister Karen McCaslin is emotional recalling the day the family received the news of Sloat’s death. She was in fifth grade when her older brother Bill came to pick her up at school. “They got me out of class, and I thought maybe he was coming home,” McCaslin says. “I remember Bill turning around to tell us that Don had died.”

Sloat received posthumously, nearly 45 years later and after extensive effort and research, the Medal of Honor. In part, the citation reads: “Sloat’s actions define the ultimate sacrifice of laying down his own life in order to save the lives of comrades. … Sloat’s extraordinary heroism and selflessness above and beyond the call of duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service.”

On Sept. 15, 2014, President Barack Obama presented the Medal of Honor to Sloat’s older brother. His mother died in 2011, but lived long enough to know the real circumstances of his death, and to know that her son gave his life to save others.

In 2017, Coweta’s middle school was named for Sloat. His death and those of seven other Coweta men during Vietnam left deep scars on a tight-knit community.

In 2017, Coweta’s middle school was renamed in Sloat’s honor. The young men and women who pass through those halls can now pause to see his memorabilia there and know they follow in the footsteps of heroes.

 

Donald Sloat

1949-1970

Service Branch: U.S. Army

Hometown: Coweta

Conflict: Vietnam

Medal of Honor Received: For heroism in action on Jan. 17, 1970

Named in his honor: Donald P. Sloat Junior High School, Coweta

Citation Excerpt: Sloat distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty.

 

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Archive »You Might Like

Camp Fire Expands Helpful Services in Tulsa

The expansion will allow Camp Fire to serve 300 more kids per year in its after-school and youth leadership programs.

From the editor: Thank you for your service.

I say those five words aloud, in my thoughts and in my prayers.

Helpful Harmonies For Wellness Combats Memory Loss

Signature Symphony program helps those with dementia and Alzheimer’s.
Edit Module

Add your comment:

 

Get the best in arts, entertainment and more straight to your inbox.

Join our email list

Edit ModuleShow Tags

March 2019

Tulsa Cyber Summit 2019 welcomes information executives, system administrators, and cyber security innovators for three days exploration into the latest cyber security challenges and strategies,...

Cost: See website

Where:
Hyatt Regency – downtown Tulsa
100 E. 2nd St.
Tulsa, OK  74103
View map »


Sponsor: The University of Tulsa and the George Kaiser Family Foundation
Telephone: 918-631-3730
Contact Name: Gail Ellis
Website »

More information

Men and women from across the American West played critical roles — both “over there” and on the home front — in helping the Allies win World War I. The American Expeditionary Force (AEF)...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

The Museum’s Dickinson Research Center is home to more than 700,000 photographs, 44,000 books, and perhaps unexpectedly, at least 1,000 horses. Meet some of the herd in Horseplay, the new...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

As Lakota artist Oscar Howe wrote in 1958, “There is much more to Indian art than pretty, stylized pictures.” This exhibition highlights this depth and the 20th century American masters who...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Few animals conjure the power and symbolic presence of the North American bison. Whether painted on a tipi or an artist’s canvas, minted on a nickel, or seen grazing in Yellowstone National Park,...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

 It's baseball time in Tulsa! Come and support the Golden Eagles on their road to the NCAA 2019 championship. All children ages 13 and under, accompanied by an adult, will be allowed in to all...

Cost: 7-14

Where:
J.L. JOHNSON STADIUM
7777 S Lewis Ave
Tulsa, OK  74137
View map »


Website »

More information

L.A. born, Dallas-based funk rock artist Stone Mecca will be performing live at the Soundpony Bar, Tulsa OK. As a psychedelic blues-rock artist and guitarist, Stone Mecca combines his love of...

Cost: Free Show

Where:
Soundpony Bar
401 N. Main Street
Tulsa, OK  74103
View map »

More information

Show More...
Show Less...

Tulsa Cyber Summit 2019 welcomes information executives, system administrators, and cyber security innovators for three days exploration into the latest cyber security challenges and strategies,...

Cost: See website

Where:
Hyatt Regency – downtown Tulsa
100 E. 2nd St.
Tulsa, OK  74103
View map »


Sponsor: The University of Tulsa and the George Kaiser Family Foundation
Telephone: 918-631-3730
Contact Name: Gail Ellis
Website »

More information

Men and women from across the American West played critical roles — both “over there” and on the home front — in helping the Allies win World War I. The American Expeditionary Force (AEF)...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

The Museum’s Dickinson Research Center is home to more than 700,000 photographs, 44,000 books, and perhaps unexpectedly, at least 1,000 horses. Meet some of the herd in Horseplay, the new...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

As Lakota artist Oscar Howe wrote in 1958, “There is much more to Indian art than pretty, stylized pictures.” This exhibition highlights this depth and the 20th century American masters who...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Few animals conjure the power and symbolic presence of the North American bison. Whether painted on a tipi or an artist’s canvas, minted on a nickel, or seen grazing in Yellowstone National Park,...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Think you can’t do something? Think again! All workshops are from 12 to 12:45 p.m. on Mondays in the Center for Creativity. All supplies provided. No workshop March 18.

Cost: Free and open to the public

Where:
McKeon Center for Creativity
910 S. Boston Ave.
TCC Metro Campus
Tulsa, OK  74135
View map »


Sponsor: Tulsa Community College
Telephone: 918-595-7339
Contact Name: Cindy Armstrong
Website »

More information

Magi 4 Christ Campers meet each Monday at 6:00 PM until 7:30 PM. At 4241 S. 37th W. Ave., Tulsa, OK. 74107.  We are a Christian group of camping enthusiasts. We are family friendly. Meeting...

Cost: Donations only

Where:
Hope House
4241 S. 37th W. Ave.
South Door Activity Center
Tulsa, OK  74107
View map »


Sponsor: Magi 4 Christ Campers
Telephone: 918-906-0564
Contact Name: Dorothy Brown

More information

Show More...
Show Less...

Tulsa Cyber Summit 2019 welcomes information executives, system administrators, and cyber security innovators for three days exploration into the latest cyber security challenges and strategies,...

Cost: See website

Where:
Hyatt Regency – downtown Tulsa
100 E. 2nd St.
Tulsa, OK  74103
View map »


Sponsor: The University of Tulsa and the George Kaiser Family Foundation
Telephone: 918-631-3730
Contact Name: Gail Ellis
Website »

More information

As Lakota artist Oscar Howe wrote in 1958, “There is much more to Indian art than pretty, stylized pictures.” This exhibition highlights this depth and the 20th century American masters who...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Men and women from across the American West played critical roles — both “over there” and on the home front — in helping the Allies win World War I. The American Expeditionary Force (AEF)...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

The Museum’s Dickinson Research Center is home to more than 700,000 photographs, 44,000 books, and perhaps unexpectedly, at least 1,000 horses. Meet some of the herd in Horseplay, the new...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Few animals conjure the power and symbolic presence of the North American bison. Whether painted on a tipi or an artist’s canvas, minted on a nickel, or seen grazing in Yellowstone National Park,...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

WHAT: Spring 2019 Lunch and Learn Partnership Series with Tulsa Master Gardeners and Tulsa City County Central Library. Bring your lunch and learn from Tulsa Master Gardeners. WHO: Tulsa Master...

Cost: Free

Where:
Central Library
400 Civic Center
Tulsa, OK
View map »


Sponsor: Tulsa Master Gardeners
Telephone: 918-746-3701
Website »

More information

 It's baseball time in Tulsa! Come and support the Golden Eagles on their road to the NCAA 2019 championship. All children ages 13 and under, accompanied by an adult, will be allowed in to all...

Cost: 7-14

Where:
J.L. JOHNSON STADIUM
7777 S Lewis Ave
Tulsa, OK  74137
View map »


Website »

More information

Show More...
Show Less...

Men and women from across the American West played critical roles — both “over there” and on the home front — in helping the Allies win World War I. The American Expeditionary Force (AEF)...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Few animals conjure the power and symbolic presence of the North American bison. Whether painted on a tipi or an artist’s canvas, minted on a nickel, or seen grazing in Yellowstone National Park,...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

The Museum’s Dickinson Research Center is home to more than 700,000 photographs, 44,000 books, and perhaps unexpectedly, at least 1,000 horses. Meet some of the herd in Horseplay, the new...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

As Lakota artist Oscar Howe wrote in 1958, “There is much more to Indian art than pretty, stylized pictures.” This exhibition highlights this depth and the 20th century American masters who...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Every Wednesday Live Event Trivia is at The Willows Family Ales - Show starts at 7 and is free to play! Movie scenes, Finish the Lyric, Classic Trivia, and more! The crew from T-Town Tacos will be...

Cost: Free

Where:
The Willows Family Ales
418 south peoria ave
tulsa, OK  74120
View map »


Sponsor: The Willows Family Ales
Telephone: (918) 895-6798
Contact Name: Julian Morgan
Website »

More information

Show More...
Show Less...

The Museum’s Dickinson Research Center is home to more than 700,000 photographs, 44,000 books, and perhaps unexpectedly, at least 1,000 horses. Meet some of the herd in Horseplay, the new...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Few animals conjure the power and symbolic presence of the North American bison. Whether painted on a tipi or an artist’s canvas, minted on a nickel, or seen grazing in Yellowstone National Park,...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

As Lakota artist Oscar Howe wrote in 1958, “There is much more to Indian art than pretty, stylized pictures.” This exhibition highlights this depth and the 20th century American masters who...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Men and women from across the American West played critical roles — both “over there” and on the home front — in helping the Allies win World War I. The American Expeditionary Force (AEF)...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Still Struggling with CPAP? Get relief with Upper Airway Stimulation therapy. Upper Airway Stimulation (UAS) therapy is a breakthrough sleep apnea treatment that works inside your body with your...

Cost: FREE

Where:
Laureate Conference Center
6655 Yale Avenue
Tulsa, OK  74136
View map »


Telephone: 763-235-6727
Contact Name: Erin Anderson
Website »

More information

Unwind with an evening in the Garden! Experience the vibrant colors and intoxicating fragrances as tulips, daffodils, hyacinths and crocuses blossom! Each week will feature different local artists...

Cost: FREE for Garden members; $8 for ages 13+; $4 for ages 3–12. 2 & under Free

Where:
Tulsa Botanic Garden
3900 Tulsa Botanic Drive
Tulsa, OK  74127
View map »


Sponsor: Tulsa Botanic Garden
Telephone: 918-289-0330
Contact Name: Lori Hutson
Website »

More information

Still Struggling with CPAP? Get relief with Upper Airway Stimulation therapy. Upper Airway Stimulation (UAS) therapy is a breakthrough sleep apnea treatment that works inside your body with your...

Cost: FREE

Where:
Laureate Conference Center
6655 Yale Avenue
Tulsa, OK  74136
View map »


Telephone: 763-235-6727
Contact Name: Erin Anderson
Website »

More information

Calling all Jousters, Wenches, Wizards and Peasants! Let it be known on the 28th day, the 4th Thursday, of the 1st month of spring in the 19th year of the 2nd millennium a journey shall commence....

Cost: $10 General Admission / $15 Bistro Seating

Where:
Lynn Ruiggs Theatre / OkEq
621 East 4th St.
Tulsa, OK  74120
View map »


Sponsor: Oklahomans for Equality / Pat Hobbs
Telephone: 918-637-25866
Contact Name: Pat Hobbs
Website »

More information

Show More...
Show Less...

Garage sale hosted by the youth students of God's Church.  All of the money goes to support youth ministries and activities.  Come find your treasure at God's Church.

Cost: Free

Where:
God's Church
1301 S Canton Ave
Tulsa, OK  74112
View map »


Sponsor: God's Church
Contact Name: Randy Alley

More information

The Museum’s Dickinson Research Center is home to more than 700,000 photographs, 44,000 books, and perhaps unexpectedly, at least 1,000 horses. Meet some of the herd in Horseplay, the new...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

As Lakota artist Oscar Howe wrote in 1958, “There is much more to Indian art than pretty, stylized pictures.” This exhibition highlights this depth and the 20th century American masters who...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Few animals conjure the power and symbolic presence of the North American bison. Whether painted on a tipi or an artist’s canvas, minted on a nickel, or seen grazing in Yellowstone National Park,...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Men and women from across the American West played critical roles — both “over there” and on the home front — in helping the Allies win World War I. The American Expeditionary Force (AEF)...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Learn about finishing your bachelor's degree at this free, informational conference. You'll learn about degree programs, transfer options and other opportunities at OSU-Tulsa. Guests are...

Cost: Free

Where:
OSU-Tulsa
700 N. Greenwood Ave.
Tulsa, OK  74106
View map »


Website »

More information

Orange Peel Tulsa at the historic Cain’s Ballroom will feature country music star Pat Green with Owasso native Allie Colleen. Proceeds from the event will support scholarships for Tulsa-area...

Cost: $35

Where:
Cain's Ballroom
423 N Main
Tulsa, OK  74103
View map »


Sponsor: Tulsa OSU Alumni Chapter
Telephone: 405-744-5368
Contact Name: Amber Hinkle
Website »

More information

 It's baseball time in Tulsa! Come and support the Golden Eagles on their road to the NCAA 2019 championship. All children ages 13 and under, accompanied by an adult, will be allowed in to all...

Cost: 7-14

Where:
J.L. JOHNSON STADIUM
7777 S Lewis Ave
Tulsa, OK  74137
View map »


Website »

More information

An Evening Honoring 2019 Hall of Fame Inductees and celebrating the 80th Anniversary of Will Rogers High School.  The evening will feature cocktails, dinner and a Silent Auction.  2019...

Cost: $80.00/person inclusive

Where:
DoubleTree Hotel Downtown
616 West Seventh Street
Tulsa, OK  74127
View map »


Sponsor: Will Rogers High School Community Foundation
Telephone: 918-495-0742
Contact Name: Beth Abdo Dennis
Website »

More information

Show More...
Show Less...

This is a class to learn some techniques in polymer clay. Polymer clay is an oven-bake medium that bakes into strong and functional art. March's class, Tiny Treats, will take place on March 30th,...

Cost: 30

Where:
ahha Tulsa
101 E Archer St,
Tulsa, OK  74103
View map »


Sponsor: Tiny Things by Bowen
Contact Name: Sarah Bowen
Website »

More information

Garage sale hosted by the youth students of God's Church.  All of the money goes to support youth ministries and activities.  Come find your treasure at God's Church.

Cost: Free

Where:
God's Church
1301 S Canton Ave
Tulsa, OK  74112
View map »


Sponsor: God's Church
Contact Name: Randy Alley

More information

This course provides an overview of the history of beer, brewing process, styles, beer tasting, beer and food pairing, and the industry behind the business of beer. The knowledge gained from...

Cost: $50

Where:
OSU-Tulsa
700 N. Greenwood Ave.
Tulsa, OK  74106
View map »


Sponsor: OSU-Tulsa
Website »

More information

St. John and Ascension will host a Medical Mission at Home event on Saturday, March 30 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Eastland Baptist Church Family Center.  Medical Mission at Home events aim to...

Cost: Free of charge

Where:
Eastland Baptist Church Family Center
12929 E. 21st Street
Tulsa, OK  74134
View map »


Sponsor: St. John Health System and Ascension
Telephone: 918-744-2404
Contact Name: Stephanie Farris
Website »

More information

As Lakota artist Oscar Howe wrote in 1958, “There is much more to Indian art than pretty, stylized pictures.” This exhibition highlights this depth and the 20th century American masters who...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Men and women from across the American West played critical roles — both “over there” and on the home front — in helping the Allies win World War I. The American Expeditionary Force (AEF)...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Few animals conjure the power and symbolic presence of the North American bison. Whether painted on a tipi or an artist’s canvas, minted on a nickel, or seen grazing in Yellowstone National Park,...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

The Museum’s Dickinson Research Center is home to more than 700,000 photographs, 44,000 books, and perhaps unexpectedly, at least 1,000 horses. Meet some of the herd in Horseplay, the new...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Hear ye Hear Ye Hear Ye, by Royal Proclamation of his Majesty King James V High King of Scotland, your presence is requested at His Majesties' Spring Festival.  His Majesty has ordered all...

Cost: $2-$7

Where:
Park Hills Motel and RV Park
438415 US-60
Vinita, OK  74301
View map »


Sponsor: Williams Entertainment
Telephone: 918-244-1887
Contact Name: Kittye Williams
Website »

More information

America’s LARGEST interactive comedy murder mystery dinner show is now playing at the Hilton Garden Inn Tulsa Broken Arrow! At The Dinner Detective, you’ll tackle a challenging crime while you...

Cost: 59.95

Where:
Hilton Garden Inn Tulsa- Broken Arrow
420 W Albany St.
Broken Arrow, OK  74012
View map »


Telephone: 866-496-0535
Contact Name: The Dinner Detective
Website »

More information

 It's baseball time in Tulsa! Come and support the Golden Eagles on their road to the NCAA 2019 championship. All children ages 13 and under, accompanied by an adult, will be allowed in to all...

Cost: 7-14

Where:
J.L. JOHNSON STADIUM
7777 S Lewis Ave
Tulsa, OK  74137
View map »


Website »

More information

Join us for Carnivale Rio, "The Best Party in Town," and revel in fine dining, lively dancing and unmatched surprises at Cox Business Center in downtown Tulsa. Although...

Cost: Sponsorship levels begin at $5,000. See website for more sponsor information.

Where:
Cox Business Center - Downtown Tulsa
100 Civic Center
Tulsa
Tulsa, OK  74103
View map »


Sponsor: Mental Health Association Oklahoma
Telephone: 918-382-2410
Contact Name: Lisa Turner
Website »

More information

Don't miss this fantastic opportunity to see Sweet Randi Love and The Love Thang Band at their Album Release performance! This will be one incredible show. Blues, R&B, Funk Band! High electricity...

Cost: $15.00

Where:
Studio 308
308 S Lansing Ave
Tulsa, OK  74120
View map »


Sponsor: Studio 308
Telephone: 918-638-8464
Contact Name: Paddy Harwell
Website »

More information

Show More...
Show Less...
NATA
Edit ModuleEdit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

What's New


2.6: Greater Expectations — G.T. Bynum

Tulsa's mayor on how data analysis can reinvent civic decision-making, and how social media can reconnect elected officials to the people.

Comments

Tulsa Sings! names four finalists

Samuel Briggs, Dennis Crookedacre, Molly Crookedacre and Majeste Pearson will compete and be featured in concerts April 5-6.

Comments

“Bright Star” lands at ORU

The Tony-nominated bluegrass musical is an Oklahoma premiere.

Comments

2.5: The Champ — Emeka Nnaka

The motivational speaker, mentor and advocate discusses resiliency and the power of service on the latest episode of Tulsa Talks.

Comments

Video: Blank Slate Challenge

Comments