American pie

Through its 80 years, Bama Pies has gone from upstart to worldwide success.



Courtesy Bama Cos.

Decades ago, a scrappy Texas woman named Cornelia Alabama Marshall began baking pies to support her struggling family. Word got out, and lines formed down the street outside the small Dallas store where she worked.

People loved her pies. And they still love them today, even if they don’t always realize they’re eating a Bama Pie (or one of the company’s other products).

Eighty years later, Cornelia’s granddaughter, Paula Marshall, is running the company, which under her leadership has grown from a respectable $30 million in sales in 1984 to a pie powerhouse with over $350 million in sales last year.

Marshall traces the company’s success back to her grandmother, whom she calls “Grandma Bama,” the great matriarch who not only enabled the whole business with her pie-making proficiency, but also infused an ethos that is baked into the company’s formula for success to this day.

Cornelia Alabama “Bama” and Henry “Big Dad” Marshall // Courtesy Beryl Ford Collection/Rotary Club of Tulsa, Tulsa City-County Library and Tulsa Historical Society, and Bama Cos.

 

“She was absolutely the heart and soul of the company,” Marshall says. “The recipes for the pies, and the desire to make only high-quality, good products came from her. She insisted on good ingredients and always making things the right way and training people how to do it. These were the tenets of her business.”

Turns out, the apple pie doesn’t fall far from the production line. One can imagine seeing in Paula Marshall what one likely would have seen in her grandmother: a spunky, energetic woman, determined to succeed in business the right way, with a focus that puts quality and people at the top.

“Our philosophy is to make high-quality products, sell them to our customers and to treat people right,” Marshall says.

In case anyone should forget, this uncompromising conviction is enshrined on a plaque on the stone façade of Bama’s famous Route 66 factory (Pie Land USA) located on the corner of East 11th Street and South Delaware Avenue.

The effect of this philosophy is seen in the fact that the Bama Cos. employ over 900 people and operate factories worldwide. Bama also counts among its clientele two of the world’s biggest fast food entities: the No. 1 hamburger restaurant chain and the No. 1 pizza restaurant chain. Bama supplies handheld pies, biscuits and pizza dough to these food giants.

 

Building a company; not as easy as pie

From its early days, the company was a family enterprise that grew organically as Grandma Bama’s husband, Henry, worked hard to sell his wife’s pies as far and wide as possible.

“My parents used to joke that my granddad had two left hands and two left feet and was a complete klutz in the kitchen, but he never met a stranger and he had a knack for sales,” Marshall says. “He could sell dirt to farmers.”

It was good pies, pure grit and a little bit of luck that kept Bama going through the difficult years of the Great Depression in the 1930s. And, as her children grew older, they took their mother’s recipes and their father’s sales moxie and fanned out to different cities in the Midwest, starting Bama Pie outlets in each. One of those cities happened to be an oil boomtown called Tulsa, where Marshall’s parents settled.

Marshall’s father, Paul, had dropped out of school after eighth grade to work in the family business. According to Marshall, he was nothing if not determined to sell as many of the big, round pies to as many customers as he could find. During World War II, he learned to fly and would deliver pies to air bases around the country. However, the pie business was a grind, with long hours spent overnight in the factory, on the road or in the air.

“My dad, he hated getting up at midnight, working through the night and delivering products the next day,” Marshall says. “He wanted to find a better way. He was always looking for the next thing.”

One of those “next things” was freezing the pies overnight, which allowed Bama to switch to more normal business hours. The frozen pies became extremely popular with women working in factories during the war who didn’t have time to do baking themselves. Paul also landed some large accounts, including Safeway and Bob’s Big Boy. Still, it wasn’t enough. Marshall remembers her father being gone most of the time, his car crammed with frozen pies as he set out to find even more customers.

“He kept saying he had to find a customer that would sell a million pies,” Marshall recalls. “And that’s when he started playing around with the concept of a handheld pie product and began to move away from the big, round, frozen pies. My mom would look at him like he was crazy, not believing there would be customer that would sell a million of them.”

Courtesy Bama Cos.

 

Pie-in-the-sky innovation lands huge customer

Nevertheless, Paul went to work to develop a machine that could produce a small, handheld pie.

“I’ll never forget — he woke up the entire family in the middle of the night to come see this contraption he had made,” Marshall recalls. “I was complaining because I was tired and it was so early, but he had this machine where you put the pastry in, added fruit in the middle and then you turned the crank and pie came out. He only had an eighth-grade education, but he was a brilliant guy.”

It was a huge moment in Bama’s history. Now all that was needed for this pie-oneering invention was a customer. As fortune would have it, another up-and-coming business at the time was catering to America’s growing demand for tasty food on the go. That company was McDonald’s, and Paul Marshall saw a huge opportunity.

“My dad made a cold call on Ray Kroc (McDonald’s co-founder), and that was definitely the turning point for us,” Marshall says.

Kroc agreed that a 10-cent handheld pie was the perfect complement to McDonald’s food-on-the-go model of burgers, fries and shakes. The result was the formation of a longstanding relationship with Bama that has resulted in the sale of countless millions of apple and cherry pies.

By 1969, the Bama bakeries run by other family members had closed, and only the Tulsa factory remained.

“Out of five sisters and two brothers, my dad was the only one left,” Marshall says. “He was the one who had the big vision and saw the future in fast food. He moved away from doing business the old way by getting a great customer who would buy in volume and pay the bills.”

Bama Pies at East 11th Street and South Delaware Avenue in 1943 // Courtesy Beryl Ford Collection/Rotary Club of Tulsa, Tulsa City-County LIbrary and Tulsa Historical Society, and Bama Cos.

 

Proving herself and doing it her way

Although landing McDonald’s was a transformative event for Bama, rough times lay ahead as the elder Marshall suffered a heart attack. Suddenly, company succession became an issue. However, none of the sons appeared willing or ready to take over. Paula, who had been working in the factory for years and was a college student at the time, ultimately got the nod, if somewhat reluctantly, from her father.

“My dad always said he wanted a boy, a son, running the company, but the problem was that he and my brothers disagreed a lot and my dad kept defaulting to me for things,” she explains.

Paula Marshall continues her family’s storied tradition in the Bama Cos. The family-run business is based in Tulsa, but has an international reach that touches millions each year. The company has garnered several awards over the years, including the recent B Corp certification by the independent B Lab, a nonprofit focused on bettering society through businesses that meet rigorous standards of social and environmental performance, accountability and transparency.

 

In her early 20s, Marshall was thrown into the fray, understanding the weight of her tasks at hand.

“I knew the seriousness of getting it right, but I also realized I had to do it my way,” Marshall says. “I guess I didn’t manage to screw too many things up,” she says with a laugh.

By the skin of her teeth, Marshall proved her worth and then progressively set about restructuring the company under the auspices of her business mentor, W. Edwards Deming.

“I’m such a big Deming zealot, you can’t believe it,” she says. “I love his philosophy.”

When Marshall took the reins in 1984, she began an unrelenting effort to improve the company by doing what her Grandma Bama had always done: focus on quality products. Bama gradually began diversifying its customer portfolio and building new factories in overseas markets. The corporate culture also began to change.

“My dad, as much as I loved him, he did things differently; it was more fear-based and militaristic,” Marshall says. “He did build a great company, but some things needed to be fixed. For example, when he got sick and was in the hospital, no one knew what to do. I had no idea where the formulas were; he used to keep key company information on napkins or paper towels with these little tick-marks on them.

“He didn’t really trust that people wouldn’t steal his stuff,” she explains. “I think it came from that Depression mindset that he had lived through.”

Today his daughter’s mindset, shaped by Deming, is helping position the company for continued success in the future.

 

Passionate about keeping it in the Bama family

Paula Marshall and her son, Jacob Chapman

That future, it appears, is one in which Bama will remain a family-held business. Marshall’s adult children are actively engaged with company
decision-making.

“I believe the one who works and has sweat equity in the business should have voting power,” she comments. “You see too many families that give everyone power, but they’re not invested in the business and so they’re not passionate about the company.

“We’re going to keep the business going with family members who have a passion for what we’re doing here,” she continues.

Her son, Jacob Chapman, has spent time on the factory floor and analyzing the efficiency of some of Bama’s manufacturing processes.

“I’m very passionate about it,” says Chapman, who also is a college student working on a business degree. “My own perspective is that the business has to stay in the family. We (family members) all have our own perspectives, but it’s great we can be in business together.”

Bama has hit a few rough patches over the decades, but today the private company — which does not disclose its financials — appears to be in its best shape ever. Marshall seems confident that when she is ready to hand over the reins to a successor, the company will continue to flourish.

“It’s about the business prospering and going forward, and that takes passion for the work and passion for the people, and if you have those, you’ll be successful,” Marshall says. “Then everyone around you will have that same goal, and that will keep the business alive and thriving.”

That’s a recipe Grandma Bama certainly would be proud of.

 

A Deming disciple

Probably no single person outside her immediate family has had a greater influence on Paula Marshall’s business management style than W. Edwards Deming.

You might call her a Deming disciple.

W. Edwards Deming // Courtesy the W. Edwards Deming Institute

Deming, a statistician, engineer and professor, had a profound impact on the way business management is conducted today around the world, and he is often credited with transforming Japan’s post-war economy, turning the defeated nation into an economic powerhouse.

Under Deming’s tutelage, Marshall transformed Bama’s management style and production processes, growing the company, reducing costs and waste, and increasing profitability.

Marshall was first introduced to Deming and his methods during a seminar in the 1980s as she struggled to fix Bama’s problems after taking the helm of the company. Through the years, she continued to absorb his teachings, and, more importantly, to implement them at Bama.

“With Dr. Deming, I wanted to bring in his quality management tools and to really revolutionize the company by putting processes in place that would bring us up to a standard of which we could be proud and our customers, like McDonald’s, could be proud,” Marshall says.

The key to Deming’s business philosophy is that it focuses a business on improving quality rather than focusing on reducing costs. He found that when companies did focus on quality, that products improved and costs came down.

Shortly after taking over at Bama in the mid-1980s, Marshall realized the company needed to focus on quality. When they did so, the improvement was dramatic. Instead of losing up to $4 million annually in scrap (12 to 17 tons a week) from poor quality, waste was cut to negligible levels.

“It was a great leap forward in quality,” Marshall comments.

With that focus, Bama went on to expand, building new plants in China and Europe to service a growing list of customers.

Deming’s teachings have allowed Bama to become a company that now sets quality standards, evidenced by its prestigious Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award in 2004.

“We’ve come up from the bottom, and now we’re a company that our customers consider a strategic partner that they want their other suppliers to emulate,” Marshall says.

 

42 years of Wanda’s Bama Pie

Wanda Denton

Bama Pie has been a fixture in Tulsa for 80 years now.

Wanda Denton has been a fixture at Bama for over half that time.

She has worked at Bama for 42 years, each day donning her apron, putting on a hairnet and helping churn out millions of pies and other baked goods destined for pastry lovers near and far. “Working at Bama has become like a second home to me,” Denton says.

After decades of dedicated labor, she is now a production supervisor, overseeing the manufacture of signature Bama products, including biscuits, cookies, dough and, of course, pies.

On March 17, 1975, just as shag carpet and polyester bell-bottoms were peaking, Denton walked into the famous Pie Land USA factory at East 11th Street and South Delaware Avenue and went to work on the pie production line.

“My husband didn’t want me to work, but I thought I’d try it and maybe give it six or seven months — and here I am, all these years later,” Denton says.

She would box and stack freshly made apple and cherry pies made for Bama’s biggest customer, McDonald’s. Back in those days, the pies were fried. Today, they’re baked.

What’s her most striking memory? Heavenly aromas.

“Oh my! The smells,” Denton gasps. “They are amazing! The fresh pies right off the line or out of the oven, you can’t beat them. I tell every new employee, ‘You’ll put on 20 pounds just because of the smells.’”

The Tulsa native and Central High School graduate has seen millions of pies fly off the line and out Bama’s doors over the decades. During that time, she has seen her share of change at Bama for the better.

“They’ve always taken good care of us, but through the years there’s been a lot more focus on human safety, food safety and quality,” she explains.

She adds that production processes have become much more efficient as productivity and quality has increased. Production waste and scrap, which erode profits and customer confidence, have been cut drastically from decades ago.

Bama also added a Caring Center for employees that provides counseling and training to help workers overcome any obstacles or problems on the job. The goal is to minimize employee loss in the early stages of employment when turnover can be high.

What has kept Denton at Bama?

“The people,” she says. “They care about you here. They treat you right and respect you. They focus on quality training and safety and have good benefits. They take good care of their people.”

 

Edit ModuleShow Tags

MoreScott Wigton

Remembering 3 Brave Medal Of Honor Recipients

Hometown heroes Albert Schwab, Ernest Childers and Donald Sloat served their country honorably.

Can Big Data Fix Our Rural Healthcare Crisis?

Oklahoma State University Center for Health Systems Innovation is poised to take health data analysis — and this city — into a new frontier.

Add your comment:

 

Get the best in arts, entertainment and more straight to your inbox.

Join our email list

Edit ModuleShow Tags

March 2019

As Lakota artist Oscar Howe wrote in 1958, “There is much more to Indian art than pretty, stylized pictures.” This exhibition highlights this depth and the 20th century American masters who...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Few animals conjure the power and symbolic presence of the North American bison. Whether painted on a tipi or an artist’s canvas, minted on a nickel, or seen grazing in Yellowstone National Park,...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

The Museum’s Dickinson Research Center is home to more than 700,000 photographs, 44,000 books, and perhaps unexpectedly, at least 1,000 horses. Meet some of the herd in Horseplay, the new...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Men and women from across the American West played critical roles — both “over there” and on the home front — in helping the Allies win World War I. The American Expeditionary Force (AEF)...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

               It's baseball time in Tulsa! Come and support the Golden Eagles on their road to the NCAA 2019 championship. All children ages 13 and under, accompanied by an adult, will be...

Cost: 7-14

Where:
J.L. JOHNSON STADIUM
7777 S Lewis Ave
Tulsa, OK  74137
View map »


Website »

More information

Show More...
Show Less...

Looking for something for your kids to do while you go to work this Spring Break?  Spotlight Theatre is offering this acting class taught by Crayons Improv.  Crayons will lead your...

Cost: 175

Where:
Spotlight Theatre
1381 Riverside Drive
Tulsa, OK  74127
View map »


Sponsor: Crayons Improv
Telephone: 918-557-5616
Contact Name: Nicole
Website »

More information

As Lakota artist Oscar Howe wrote in 1958, “There is much more to Indian art than pretty, stylized pictures.” This exhibition highlights this depth and the 20th century American masters who...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Men and women from across the American West played critical roles — both “over there” and on the home front — in helping the Allies win World War I. The American Expeditionary Force (AEF)...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Few animals conjure the power and symbolic presence of the North American bison. Whether painted on a tipi or an artist’s canvas, minted on a nickel, or seen grazing in Yellowstone National Park,...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

The Museum’s Dickinson Research Center is home to more than 700,000 photographs, 44,000 books, and perhaps unexpectedly, at least 1,000 horses. Meet some of the herd in Horseplay, the new...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Think you can’t do something? Think again! All workshops are from 12 to 12:45 p.m. on Mondays in the Center for Creativity. All supplies provided. No workshop March 18.

Cost: Free and open to the public

Where:
McKeon Center for Creativity
910 S. Boston Ave.
TCC Metro Campus
Tulsa, OK  74135
View map »


Sponsor: Tulsa Community College
Telephone: 918-595-7339
Contact Name: Cindy Armstrong
Website »

More information

Magi 4 Christ Campers meet each Monday at 6:00 PM until 7:30 PM. At 4241 S. 37th W. Ave., Tulsa, OK. 74107.  We are a Christian group of camping enthusiasts. We are family friendly. Meeting...

Cost: Donations only

Where:
Hope House
4241 S. 37th W. Ave.
South Door Activity Center
Tulsa, OK  74107
View map »


Sponsor: Magi 4 Christ Campers
Telephone: 918-906-0564
Contact Name: Dorothy Brown

More information

Show More...
Show Less...

WHAT: Dunkin’ is proud to keep Tyler Carach – aka The Donut Boy – running as he hands out thousands of donuts to police officers across the country with his next stop in Tulsa, Oklahoma....

Cost: Free

Where:
Tulsa County Sheriff’s Office
303 W 1st St
Tulsa, OK  74103
View map »

More information

Looking for something for your kids to do while you go to work this Spring Break?  Spotlight Theatre is offering this acting class taught by Crayons Improv.  Crayons will lead your...

Cost: 175

Where:
Spotlight Theatre
1381 Riverside Drive
Tulsa, OK  74127
View map »


Sponsor: Crayons Improv
Telephone: 918-557-5616
Contact Name: Nicole
Website »

More information

As Lakota artist Oscar Howe wrote in 1958, “There is much more to Indian art than pretty, stylized pictures.” This exhibition highlights this depth and the 20th century American masters who...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

The Museum’s Dickinson Research Center is home to more than 700,000 photographs, 44,000 books, and perhaps unexpectedly, at least 1,000 horses. Meet some of the herd in Horseplay, the new...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Few animals conjure the power and symbolic presence of the North American bison. Whether painted on a tipi or an artist’s canvas, minted on a nickel, or seen grazing in Yellowstone National Park,...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Men and women from across the American West played critical roles — both “over there” and on the home front — in helping the Allies win World War I. The American Expeditionary Force (AEF)...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Show More...
Show Less...

Bring the whole family over to the Whitty Books next Wednesday the 20th for a drop-in clay workshop! This special extended-hours polymer clay workshop is just what your Spring Break needs! Perfect...

Cost: $8

Where:
Whitty Books
2407 E Admiral Blvd
Tulsa, OK  74110
View map »


Sponsor: Tiny Things by Bowen
Contact Name: Sarah Bowen
Website »

More information

Looking for something for your kids to do while you go to work this Spring Break?  Spotlight Theatre is offering this acting class taught by Crayons Improv.  Crayons will lead your...

Cost: 175

Where:
Spotlight Theatre
1381 Riverside Drive
Tulsa, OK  74127
View map »


Sponsor: Crayons Improv
Telephone: 918-557-5616
Contact Name: Nicole
Website »

More information

Few animals conjure the power and symbolic presence of the North American bison. Whether painted on a tipi or an artist’s canvas, minted on a nickel, or seen grazing in Yellowstone National Park,...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

As Lakota artist Oscar Howe wrote in 1958, “There is much more to Indian art than pretty, stylized pictures.” This exhibition highlights this depth and the 20th century American masters who...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Men and women from across the American West played critical roles — both “over there” and on the home front — in helping the Allies win World War I. The American Expeditionary Force (AEF)...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

The Museum’s Dickinson Research Center is home to more than 700,000 photographs, 44,000 books, and perhaps unexpectedly, at least 1,000 horses. Meet some of the herd in Horseplay, the new...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Join us for an evening with Mariko Tamaki, award-winning graphic novel and comics author, as she discusses feminism in the world of comics. Book signing to follow; light refreshments provided....

Cost: Free

Where:
Central Library
400 civic center
Tulsa, OK  74103
View map »


Sponsor: Tulsa City-County Library
Telephone: 918-549-7323
Contact Name: Rebecca H
Website »

More information

Every Wednesday Live Event Trivia is at The Willows Family Ales - Show starts at 7 and is free to play! Movie scenes, Finish the Lyric, Classic Trivia, and more! The crew from T-Town Tacos will be...

Cost: Free

Where:
The Willows Family Ales
418 south peoria ave
tulsa, OK  74120
View map »


Sponsor: The Willows Family Ales
Telephone: (918) 895-6798
Contact Name: Julian Morgan
Website »

More information

Take a self-guided night hike to experience the sights and sounds along a nature trail through native prairie and forest. Wear comfortable walking shoes and bring a flashlight for this 1.5 mile...

Cost: $10 per person for members; $15 for non-members.

Where:
Tulsa Botanic Garden
3900 Tulsa Botanic Drive
Tulsa, OK  74127
View map »


Sponsor: Tulsa Botanic Garden
Telephone: 918-289-0330
Contact Name: Lori Hutson
Website »

More information

Show More...
Show Less...

Looking for something for your kids to do while you go to work this Spring Break?  Spotlight Theatre is offering this acting class taught by Crayons Improv.  Crayons will lead your...

Cost: 175

Where:
Spotlight Theatre
1381 Riverside Drive
Tulsa, OK  74127
View map »


Sponsor: Crayons Improv
Telephone: 918-557-5616
Contact Name: Nicole
Website »

More information

Mothers of Preschoolers (and preschool means prior to school, ages 6 weeks to 5 years old). MOPS warmly welcomes any mom that has at least one child age 6 weeks to 5 years old. By joining MOPS, you...

Cost: Free

Where:
Eastwood Baptist Church
948 S 91st E Ave
Tulsa, OK  74112
View map »


Sponsor: Eastwood Baptist Church
Telephone: 918-836-8686
Contact Name: Shirley Pittenger
Website »

More information

As Lakota artist Oscar Howe wrote in 1958, “There is much more to Indian art than pretty, stylized pictures.” This exhibition highlights this depth and the 20th century American masters who...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Men and women from across the American West played critical roles — both “over there” and on the home front — in helping the Allies win World War I. The American Expeditionary Force (AEF)...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Few animals conjure the power and symbolic presence of the North American bison. Whether painted on a tipi or an artist’s canvas, minted on a nickel, or seen grazing in Yellowstone National Park,...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

The Museum’s Dickinson Research Center is home to more than 700,000 photographs, 44,000 books, and perhaps unexpectedly, at least 1,000 horses. Meet some of the herd in Horseplay, the new...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

It's our FIRST LATE NIGHT of 2019!   Join Garden CEO Dr. Todd Lasseigne for a walk in the Garden to see what spring bulbs are blossoming and learn more about what goes into one of the largest...

Cost: FREE for Garden members; $8 for ages 13+; $4 for ages 3–12; 2 & under are free.

Where:
Tulsa Botanic Garden
3900 Tulsa Botanic Drive
Tulsa, OK  74127
View map »


Sponsor: Tulsa Botanic Garden
Telephone: 918-289-0330
Contact Name: Lori Hutson
Website »

More information

Show More...
Show Less...

Looking for something for your kids to do while you go to work this Spring Break?  Spotlight Theatre is offering this acting class taught by Crayons Improv.  Crayons will lead your...

Cost: 175

Where:
Spotlight Theatre
1381 Riverside Drive
Tulsa, OK  74127
View map »


Sponsor: Crayons Improv
Telephone: 918-557-5616
Contact Name: Nicole
Website »

More information

The Museum’s Dickinson Research Center is home to more than 700,000 photographs, 44,000 books, and perhaps unexpectedly, at least 1,000 horses. Meet some of the herd in Horseplay, the new...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Men and women from across the American West played critical roles — both “over there” and on the home front — in helping the Allies win World War I. The American Expeditionary Force (AEF)...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Few animals conjure the power and symbolic presence of the North American bison. Whether painted on a tipi or an artist’s canvas, minted on a nickel, or seen grazing in Yellowstone National Park,...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

As Lakota artist Oscar Howe wrote in 1958, “There is much more to Indian art than pretty, stylized pictures.” This exhibition highlights this depth and the 20th century American masters who...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

 It's baseball time in Tulsa! Come and support the Golden Eagles on their road to the NCAA 2019 championship. All children ages 13 and under, accompanied by an adult, will be allowed in to all...

Cost: 7-14

Where:
J.L. JOHNSON STADIUM
7777 S Lewis Ave
Tulsa, OK  74137
View map »


Website »

More information

Show More...
Show Less...

The Orbit Initiative, produced by The Tulsa Performing Arts Center and Trust, resumes its FREE community satellite adventures at seven local community centers this Saturday, January 12th, and...

Cost: Free

Where:
Various
Various
Tulsa, OK  Various
View map »


Sponsor: The Tulsa Performing Arts Center and Trust
Telephone: 918-596-7119
Contact Name: Jeremy Stevens
Website »

More information

The Museum’s Dickinson Research Center is home to more than 700,000 photographs, 44,000 books, and perhaps unexpectedly, at least 1,000 horses. Meet some of the herd in Horseplay, the new...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Men and women from across the American West played critical roles — both “over there” and on the home front — in helping the Allies win World War I. The American Expeditionary Force (AEF)...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

Few animals conjure the power and symbolic presence of the North American bison. Whether painted on a tipi or an artist’s canvas, minted on a nickel, or seen grazing in Yellowstone National Park,...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

As Lakota artist Oscar Howe wrote in 1958, “There is much more to Indian art than pretty, stylized pictures.” This exhibition highlights this depth and the 20th century American masters who...

Cost: $12.50 adult entry

Where:
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
1700 NE 63rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73111
View map »

More information

We are hosting a traditional Wild Onion Dinner as a fundraiser this Saturday Mar 23rd.Menu: wild onions (locally harvested & cooked with eggs), fry bread, fried chicken, beans, potatoes, salt...

Cost: $10

Where:
Yuchi House
1010 S. Main St.
Sapulpa, OK  74066
View map »


Sponsor: Yuchi Language Project
Website »

More information

America’s LARGEST interactive comedy murder mystery dinner show is now playing at the Hilton Garden Inn Tulsa Broken Arrow! At The Dinner Detective, you’ll tackle a challenging crime while you...

Cost: 59.95

Where:
Hilton Garden Inn Tulsa- Broken Arrow
420 W Albany St.
Broken Arrow, OK  74012
View map »


Telephone: 866-496-0535
Contact Name: The Dinner Detective
Website »

More information

 It's baseball time in Tulsa! Come and support the Golden Eagles on their road to the NCAA 2019 championship. All children ages 13 and under, accompanied by an adult, will be allowed in to all...

Cost: 7-14

Where:
J.L. JOHNSON STADIUM
7777 S Lewis Ave
Tulsa, OK  74137
View map »


Website »

More information

The 28th annual Sip for Sight Grand Tasting will be on Saturday, March 23, 2019 at the Renaissance Tulsa Hotel and Convention Center. Your admission lets you taste more than 70 wines, sample beer...

Cost: $85

Where:
Renaissance Hotel and Convention Center
6808 S 107th E Ave
Tulsa, OK  74133
View map »


Sponsor: Vizavance
Telephone: 918-496-3484
Contact Name: Brandon Miller
Website »

More information

Internationally acclaimed pianist Daniel Epstein comes to Bartlesville for the first time, anchoring this stirring concert with Rachmaninoff’s soaring Piano Concerto No. 2. This veteran...

Cost: $22-$44

Where:
Bartlesville Community Center
300 S.E. Adams Blvd.
Bartlesville, OK  74003
View map »


Sponsor: Bartlesville Symphony Orchestra
Telephone: 918-366-7717
Contact Name: Molly Collins
Website »

More information

Welcome to the happy-shining, phoenix-rising, reunited world of Classic Smash Mouth in 2018. For the first time in nearly a decade, all five members of what is widely-considered the...

Cost: $50, $75, $100

Where:
Osage Casino's Skyline Event Center
Tulsa, OK

More information

Show More...
Show Less...
NATA
Edit ModuleEdit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

What's New


2.6: Greater Expectations — G.T. Bynum

Tulsa's mayor on how data analysis can reinvent civic decision-making, and how social media can reconnect elected officials to the people.

Comments

Tulsa Sings! names four finalists

Samuel Briggs, Dennis Crookedacre, Molly Crookedacre and Majeste Pearson will compete and be featured in concerts April 5-6.

Comments

“Bright Star” lands at ORU

The Tony-nominated bluegrass musical is an Oklahoma premiere.

Comments

2.5: The Champ — Emeka Nnaka

The motivational speaker, mentor and advocate discusses resiliency and the power of service on the latest episode of Tulsa Talks.

Comments

Video: Blank Slate Challenge

Comments