Unified Voice: The Greater Tulsa African-American Affairs Commission

With 23 seats, the commission is an advisory committee to the City of Tulsa, mayor and city council, with the goal to address pressing issues and promote unity, cooperation, historical preservation and development.



Members of the Greater Tulsa African-American Affairs Commission include, seated, Vice Chairwoman Kristi Williams, Margaret Love, Bill White, Maybelle Wallace, Alicia Latimer, and standing, Cassia Carr, Reggie Ivey, Weldon Tisdale, Kojo Asamoa-Caesar, Burlinda Radney, Chairman Thomas Boxley, Eddie Evans, Darryl Bright, Harriette Scott Dudley, Lauren Oldham, Dewayne Dickens, Devin Fletcher, Carlisha Williams

Years of work and diligence became reality this past December when the Greater Tulsa African-American Affairs Commission convened for the first time.

Tulsa has had commissions for Hispanic Affairs, Indian Affairs and Women for years. Citizens had long requested the creation of an African-American Affairs Commission.

“Everyone said, ‘Absolutely it should have been done a long time ago,’” says Tulsa City Councilor Vanessa Hall-Harper. “I then made the request in writing on behalf of my community to the City of Tulsa’s human rights department and to Mayor (Dewey) Bartlett. I kept the community informed and engaged and provided leadership in how to fight for what is right.

“Frederick Douglass said, ‘Power concedes nothing without demand.’ We stood in our truth and refused to be quieted.”

With 23 seats, the commission is an advisory committee to the City of Tulsa, mayor and city council, with the goal to address pressing issues and promote unity, cooperation, historical preservation and development, according to the City of Tulsa Human Rights Office.

The commission has met monthly since December. Priorities have included bylaw resolution, developing a strategic plan and creating a series of committees. Helming the commission are Chairman Thomas Boxley and Vice Chairwoman Kristi Williams. They sit on the commission with other community activists and mayor-appointed representatives from local organizations.

“I don’t want this to be a commission in name only,” Boxley says. “I want to set goals, and I want to accomplish them. I want success.”

TulsaPeople asked the commissioners to share their thoughts on the most important issues facing the African-American community in Tulsa and how the commission plans to help.

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Kojo Asamoa-Caesar, 31

Founding principal, Greenwood Leadership Academy

What’s the most important issue facing the commission? How do you plan to address that? How do we serve as a truly representative voice of our community and engage people in meaningful ways so they not only feel heard, but have confidence that their concerns will be given due consideration at the table of power?

What do you see as this commission’s potential? We have the potential to synthesize the concerns and issues in our community and present them to the Mayor’s office in a coherent and palatable way so as to increase the likelihood of meaningful action to address those concerns and issues.

What do you consider to be the commission’s greatest strength? Our greatest strength is that our community is hungry for a commission like this and that drives significant engagement from constituents and a desire to help the commission carry out its duties.

At the six-month mark, what would you like to have the commission accomplish? At the end of six months, if we have a solid strategic plan in place and the community at-large understands our purpose and plan and we’ve given ample opportunity for people to engage with the commission and give their feedback as well as provide input, and we’ve taken concrete and meaningful actions towards implementing what is in our strategic plan and we’ve achieved one or two recognizable wins — that would represent a good six-month start.

How has the community responded to the commission? The African-American community has been glad to see that a commission that was long overdue has finally been established. I think they are hopeful that this can be a catalyst for driving positive and meaningful change in our community, but they’re also not just going to sit around and wait to see what happens. They want to get involved, they want to attend our meetings and testify, they want to be on subcommittees and propose solutions to our most pressing challenges.

What do you want Tulsans to know about the commission? This commission is good for all of Tulsa. As the African-American community goes, so goes the whole city of Tulsa.

What do you love about Tulsa? The resilience of the people. We are an eternally hopeful people and we have our eyes set on the future and intend on winning it.

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Thomas Boxley, 45

Marketing/PR official with OU Physicians and founder, the Institute of Developing Communities; commission chairman

What’s the most important issue facing the commission? How do you plan to address that? There are several issues that the commission will need to address within the African-American diaspora in the Greater Tulsa area — everything from small business contracting opportunities with the City and State to policing and criminal justice reform. These issues will be addressed via input from community members and organized action depending upon the issue at hand. There are some issues and problems that we will not be able to effectively address given our role, responsibility and vested powers but we will work to identify solutions to problems that exist within the African-American community.

What do you see as this commission’s potential? The commission has the potential to provide a voice and point-of-connection for the citizens of this city of African-American descent that have experienced a sense of disenfranchisement.

What do you consider to be the commission’s greatest strength? The strength of the commission lies within the diversity of its members. There is a diverse age range and professional makeup that has been convened to participate.

At the six-month mark, what would you like to have the commission accomplish? I would like to see the infrastructure developed that will guide the work of the commission in the first three to five years, as well as for the commissioners to develop a close working relationship with one another. Both are extremely important when you bring a large group of people together that have not really had an opportunity to work together.

What do you want Tulsans to know about the commission? That the body will work to address issues that will strengthen Tulsa as a whole.

What do you love about Tulsa? The pride that Tulsans have in the community that we call home.   

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Cassia C. Carr, 31

Attorney; representative for the Tulsa Economic Development Corp.

What’s the most important issue facing the commission? How do you plan to address that? The most important issue facing the commission is how to use the forum to foster trust between the black community and the City of Tulsa. We will plan to address this issue by being present in the community and following through with our promises.

What do you see as this commission’s potential? To shed light on issues that have been overlooked in the past.

At the six-month mark, what would you like to have the commission accomplish? A seamless procedure for hearing issues from the community and addressing them.

What do you want Tulsans to know about the commission? That it exists and we are here to serve the people of Tulsa.

What do you love about Tulsa? I love Tulsa’s diversity and its philanthropic vibe.

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Dewayne Dickens, 52

Tulsa Community College professor; representative for the John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation

What’s the most important issue facing the commission? How do you plan to address that? Disproportionate access to quality community resources within North Tulsa is the most important issue facing the commission. For example, we do have food,   retail and educational opportunities within the northern part of the city. However, we do not have an equitable selection of food, retail and educational locations for these resources that represent the economic contributions of the citizens within the area. Specifically, having limited food access in a Grade C store is not the same as having varied food selection in a Grade A or B store. The same applies when citizens have Grade C retail and educational experiences compared to their southside residents who have more options for Grade A and B experiences in their communities. 

In response to these inequities that are part of a systemic pattern in Tulsa, my plan is to work with my fellow commissioners and Tulsa’s citizens to identify ways to counter the systemic policies and inaction that have allowed for unbalanced funding of economic development within north Tulsa compared to south Tulsa. My plan is to work with the community and involve the community in determining the best approach to right years of inequitable support, while also inspiring self-sustained entrepreneurship and business plans that sustain the northside community.

What do you see as this commission’s potential? The commission has an opportunity to provide more transparency of the government’s actions and plans to improve the potential for African Americans in Tulsa. The commission can channel the concerns of the community by bringing forward what appear to be the most pressing issues expressed by the community, but also the factual evidence that supports expressed concerns. The commission can serve as a bridge to connect the community members to the government leaders who need to know both combined and individual concerns of the community members — recognizing that a community has both collective and divergent needs that need to be addressed.  The commission has collective and divergent points of view that serve merely as a starting point for the collective and divergent wishes of the community.  Our points of view should lead us to seek out the many perspectives that exist in our community so that more voices can inform the decision making that happens within Tulsa’s legislative leadership areas.

What do you consider to be the commission’s greatest strength? The commission has a great strength in the diversity of its perspectives, representation and connection to the community. While these are strengths, the important strategy for the commission is to use these recognized strengths to tap into the community members who they are connected with as sounding boards and as the members they advocate for when working within commission activities.  When I consider how perspective, representation and connection work together, my understanding is that our No. 1 goal is to be involved with and listen to the community, and bring forward important trends that emerge based on what has been heard. And since our commissioners are of varied perspectives, representation, and connections within the community, the strength of this diversity will allow more voices to be brought forward while the commission does its work.

At the six-month mark, what would you like to have the commission accomplish? The six-month mark is not far away, so by-laws have been established, and the commission is working on ways to get to know one another and establish better ways of communication with the citizens of Tulsa — particularly the African-American community members, whether in north Tulsa or any part of the Tulsa area. I would like to focus on how we hear from these community members through a variety of mechanisms.  Some people will come to commission meetings, some will post comments through social media or email, while others will remain silent publicly but have many ideas they express in more intimate settings. One of my major concerns will be how we solicit feedback from not only the highly vocal community members of Tulsa on African-American affairs, but also what approaches can we make as part of our Strategic Plan that allows us to bring forward the voices of the less vocal community members.

How has the community responded to the commission? The community has provided a positive, encouraging response that is balanced with cautious optimism. Tulsa’s African-American community has had many empty promises that have not always been followed through with, so the commission gives hope that this time the City will listen and respond in good faith. The Tulsa community is watching. Other cities across the country are watching. Everyone wants to know if we can live up to the potential of our City’s values to advance the needs of all of Tulsa. People are watching to see if we will do the right thing based on serving all of Tulsa and not just certain pockets of the Tulsa community. We are all part of this test of trust. If the commission can walk this quite delicate line that reconciles past deeds of distrust through new approaches that empower African-American communities along with other Tulsa communities, I believe the community will be pleasantly assured that a new page of Tulsa history has been turned and will serve as a true model for future generations.

What do you want Tulsans to know about the commission? The commission wants to hear from you, partner with you, and advocate for what matters to you. We want every community in Tulsa to be better, be empowered and be connected. We understand that each part of Tulsa has a ripple effect on all of the other parts, so we want the good ripples in communities of Tulsa to be replicated and strengthened (through any efforts we can foster), and we want the ineffective and damaging ripples to be countered, extinguished and repaired.

What do you love about Tulsa? I love Tulsa because no other city can capture such a deep history of people who have a genuine heart to help others and dream for a better tomorrow in spite of repeated tragedy.  Tulsans do not claim perfection, but they do claim resilience. Tulsans do not give up due to adversity; instead, Tulsans band together to survive while they reach higher goals and bring others along as they advance. The commission is an example of how Tulsans are striving to reach higher for our communities — while elevating every community and individual along the way.

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Harriette Scott Dudley, 49

Tulsa Community College dean

What’s the most important issue facing the commission? How do you plan to address that? For me it is a tie between building trust between the African-American community and local government/leaders and engaging the entire community in action that will improve the quality of life for African Americans in Tulsa, specifically, people of color, generally, and ultimately for all people in Tulsa.      

How do you plan to address that issue? By following the leadership of Chairman Boxley, using my experience, skills and talents when and where they are requested/required, and staying focused, consistent, positive and engaged.

What do you see as this commission’s potential? This commission’s potential is limitless. I am always amazed when I hear the voices around the table. I believe we have the capacity to accomplish all that the community expects of us and more. However, we can’t do it alone and we certainly can’t sustain it alone.

What do you consider to be the commission’s greatest strength? The diversity among the commissioners. We all identify as African American and yet we have very different perspectives, backgrounds, experiences and ideas for accomplishing the goals of the commission.

At the six-month mark, what would you like to have the commission accomplish? A strategic plan with outcomes and timelines.

How has the community responded to the commission? Wow! I would say the community has responded with a long list of expectations, a warning that we are being watched and held accountable, lots of advice and historical perspectives, and love…lots of love.

What do you want Tulsans to know about the commission? We meet the second Tuesday of the month at 6 p.m. in City Hall. Come see us, pray with and for us, and join us in this work. We are here to listen, learn, and act.

What do you love about Tulsa? The history and the potential of the city to do great things.

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Eddie L. Evans, 70

Director (retired), Youth Services of Tulsa; president of the 100 Black Men of Tulsa Inc.

What’s the most important issue facing the commission? How do you plan to address that? The deficiencies presenting themselves to the African-American community. Plan to become involved in the resolution process.

What do you see as this commission’s potential? To provide input that can/will be considered by the Tulsa city government.

What do you consider to be the commission’s greatest strength? Access to the Mayor and City Council.

At the six-month mark, what would you like to have the commission accomplish? An established relationship with the African-American community.

How has the community responded to the commission? Appears to accept the need for the commission, but has many questions.

What do you want Tulsans to know about the commission? That it intends to be affective and be a voice for the community.

What do you love about Tulsa? The people and the love/passion they have for the community in which they live.

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Devin Fletcher, 32

Chief learning and chief talent officer, Tulsa Public Schools

What’s the most important issue facing the commission? How do you plan to address that? There has been a long history of systemic inequity, disenfranchisement and a betrayal of trust within our community. We must ensure that we don’t become paralyzed by the challenges but ignited by the opportunities.  We are going to listen, we are going to prioritize, and we are going to get to work.

What do you see as this commission’s potential? I believe that we have an opportunity to:

  • understand what our community is saying;
  • develop an agenda that pushes for investment in high quality reforms and initiatives;
  • underscore the inequalities that exist but truly elevating and celebrating our many successes as a community; and
  • promote the urgency of “now.”

What do you consider to be the commission’s greatest strength? The commission’s greatest strength is the diverse group of leaders that make up the commission that are all coming together with a collective commitment to serve the community above our individual beliefs. 

At the six-month mark, what would you like to have the commission accomplish? I would like the commission to have a strong platform of concerns that have come from and have been vetted by the community that we are all collectively working on addressing.

How has the community responded to the commission? The community is excited about the potential of the commission and the promise that it represents. This committee represents progress and hopefulness that true change is possible.

What do you want Tulsans to know about the commission? The commission is committed whole-heartedly to representing voice of the entire community. We are servants first and foremost and understand that our role is to ensure that we are elevating the voice from the community and not our own.

What do you love about Tulsa? I love the spirit of the Tulsa community and the commitment to collectively work together to address systemic social change.

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Raganald (Reggie) Ivey, 48

Chief operating officer, Tulsa City-County Health Department; representative for the North Tulsa Community Coalition

What’s the most important issue facing the commission? This is a difficult question to answer with a single response, as there are a multitude of issues facing the commission. The commission is charged with examining and defining issues pertaining to the rights and needs of African-Americans, and making recommendations to the Mayor for changes that are necessary to create a sense of one Tulsa. If I were to choose one issue that could be most challenging for the commission, it would be ensuring historical accuracy and requiring that the truth be told about the African-American experience in Tulsa, especially as it relates to the 1921 Race Riot.

How do you plan to address that issue? It is important for the commission to encourage the inclusion of the truth of Tulsa’s history as relates to the 1921 Race Riot. For Tulsa to heal and truly reconcile, we can no longer hide history, but must speak to how the residue from such a tragedy impacts the lives of African Americans today. The impact of historical trauma continues to affect the lives of African Americans and other marginalized groups. Furthermore, systematic social inequities and institutional biases in areas such as the criminal justice system, educational system, corporations and neighborhood conditions continue to negatively impact African Americans and others. The commission’s strategic plan will be the guide that will help us address these issues.

What do you see as this commission’s potential? The commission is an organized body that can advise and share pertinent information with City leaders in an organized and unified format that involves a wide range of community voices. 

What do you consider to be the commission’s greatest strength? The diversity of the commission is its greatest strength. Four generations are represented on the commission: Millennials, Gen Xers, Baby Boomers and Traditionalists. Additionally, there is almost an equal balance of genders and a wide range of professions. Although there are many unique perspectives, there is also a singular goal to make Tulsa better.

At the six-month mark, what would you like to have the commission accomplish? By the six-month mark, the commission hopes to have a clearly defined strategic plan in place. Additionally, we anticipate a high level of community involvement by this point.

How has the community responded to the commission? The community is excited to see the development of the commission. However, the commission has been challenged to ensure that broad community feedback and input is sought.   

What do you want Tulsans to know about the commission? The members of the commission are committed to bringing viable recommendations and solutions forward to improve the lives of African Americans in Tulsa and surrounding communities.  

What do you love about Tulsa? Tulsa is a great city to raise a family. The cost of living is reasonable and housing is affordable. Tulsa is a beautiful city, with a developing downtown. There are unique amenities, such as Gilcrease Museum, Philbrook Museum, the Greenwood Cultural Center, BOK Center, Drillers Stadium and the Tulsa Zoo. Tulsa also has a variety of post-secondary educational opportunities. Although Tulsa has some challenges, it gives me hope that we are having conversations about race relations, reconciliation and disparities broadly as a City. I believe it is possible for Tulsa to become a City that appreciates all of its citizens.

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Margaret M. Love, 75

Retired social worker; adjunct professor at Langston University. Love is one of four individuals who contacted former Mayor Dewey Bartlett Jr. requesting to form the African-American Affairs Commission.

What’s the most important issue facing the commission? How do you plan to address that? I dare to say the most important, as all issues are important. Some of the top issues would be education, economic development and criminal justice to name a few.

How do you plan to address that issue? One by one as this is a continuous process.

What do you see as this commission’s potential? The potentials are many, but our primary goal is to act in an advisory capacity to the greater Tulsa area to encourage and promote unity, purpose and understanding among the African-American people.

What do you consider to be the Commission’s greatest strength? The ability to make recommendations to city government in hopes to facilitate equity.

At the six-month mark, what would you like to have the commission accomplish? Once we begin to make recommendations the continued support of the City Council and Mayor.

How has the community responded to the commission? Overwhelmingly well. This has been a long time coming and the community is excited about and willing to participate in this great process as needed as they see this commission and finally having a voice.

What do you want Tulsans to know about the commission? That we are advocates for the African-American population, as well as supportive of the overall city in general.

What do you love about Tulsa? The expectation of possible growth and cultural competence among the city leaders. 

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Lauren Oldham, 27

Attorney

What’s the most important issue facing the commission? How do you plan to address that? Economic and health disparities for Tulsa’s African-American residents. Through our role as advocates and advisors to the Mayor and other city officials, we can address these issues by utilizing research and community input to develop targeted programming relating to these issues.

What do you see as this commission’s potential? The commission has the potential to be a hub for community resources and engagement. Through community organization, the commission can be the focal point for addressing concerns affecting Tulsa’s African-American community.

What do you consider to be the commission’s greatest strength? The diverse age, backgrounds, and experiences of the commissioners, which will lead to diverse ideas, actions and solutions from the commission.

At the six-month mark, what would you like to have the commission accomplish? Establish open and consistent lines of communication with the community through which the commission can provide information.

How has the community responded to the commission? Community response has been positive. The community has long-awaited a commission that addresses their needs and advocates on their behalf to the City and elected officials.

What do you want Tulsans to know about the commission? The commission is dedicated to understanding and resolving community needs through its advisory and advocacy role to the City.

What do you love about Tulsa? Philanthropic community, Black Wall Street, and the food and bar scene.

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Burlinda Radney, 55

Realtor and geophysicist; representative for the Business and Agents Networking Group 

What’s the most important issue facing the commission? The African-American community of Tulsa faces a crisis in education as we confront persistently unsatisfactory elementary, intermediate and secondary school achievement. This issue directly impacts efforts to narrow the African-American wealth gap and to interrupt the school-to-prison pipeline that too many Black children fall into. 

How do you plan to address that issue? In the first year, the commission will focus on establishing a committee-based structure to link leaders and innovators in the community with commissioners in order to establish and empower citizens with a structure to strategize, develop and implement issue specific action plans to redress concerns in the community.

What do you see as this commission’s potential? The commission can become a vehicle that operates as a resource hub for community advocacy, economic development and strategic planning for the future. 

What do you consider to be the commission’s greatest strength? The diversity of talents, experience and community interests in the appointed commissioners is the greatest strength of this board. 

At the six-month mark, what would you like to have the commission accomplish? I expect to have contributed toward the creation of a strategic plan for improving K-3 attainment, improving home ownership and access to quality housing and continuation of Councilor (Vanessa) Hall-Harper’s efforts to support prison reentry/employment development for convicted felons.

How has the community responded to the commission? I am pleased to report an enthusiastic response, from most if not all.

What do you want Tulsans to know about the commission? The GTAAAC was founded as a consensus driven body focused on creating the foundations for African-Americans success in the Tulsa community.

What do you love about Tulsa? Tulsa is blessed with a history of diversity and success in all of its diverse communities. I look forward to contributing to creating an equally rich and successful future for Tulsa’s citizens.

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Kuma Roberts, 43

Executive director of talent attraction, retention and Mosaic, Tulsa Regional Chamber

What’s the most important issue facing the commission? The most important issue facing the commission is how to best unify the African-American community toward one vision/voice. The community is fragmented and the commission has to address that challenge.

How do you plan to address that issue? I think understanding the role each of us will have as representatives of all African Americans in the greater Tulsa area will help inform why we are each motivated to serve in this capacity and honoring those motivations through compromise for the betterment of the community.

What do you see as this commission’s potential? If we can begin to leverage and communicate one voice/a unified vision for our community we can make significant changes to education, health, economic development and empowerment while educating the others on just how far we’ve come since the 1921 Race Massacre.

What do you consider to be the commission’s greatest strength? The diversity and passion of those who are serving. Each brings a crucial piece to unlocking the puzzle of how to make our community better.

At the six-month mark, what would you like to have the commission accomplish? I think clarity of intention, vision and show of unity will be a huge accomplishment and would be important for the African-American community to see and witness.

How has the community responded to the commission? I’m not sure the community is aware that the commission is active and ready to engage with them. Turnout at meetings has been the same few people who represent a fraction of those we serve. My hope is that once we can begin to communicate effectively we can have more community response to our presence and to our work. Seeing and hearing from a wider variety of individuals representing our community will be very important in guiding our work.

What do you want Tulsans to know about the commission? The Greater Tulsa African-American Affairs Commission has been a long time coming. The community has been disenfranchised for far too long and it will take all Tulsans to acknowledge and address the very real and pressing issues that face the African-American community and why these challenges still exist.

What do you love about Tulsa? I love Tulsa because it’s a place where anyone who is passionate, committed and engaged can make an impact. It’s on the verge of making strides toward ensuring ALL of its citizens are entitled to a quality of life that rival other cities. I’m excited to play a small part of that.

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Weldon Tisdale

Senior pastor, Friendship Church

What do you see as this commission’s potential? I see the potential as great.

What do you consider to be the commission’s greatest strength? The diverse talent of the commission.

How has the community responded to the commission? Too early to say. However, there has been some positive response from individuals.

What do you want Tulsans to know about the commission? That we exist to bring awareness and proposed solutions to the most important issues facing African Americans in Tulsa.

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Maybelle Wallace, 88

Executive director, Theatre North

What’s the most important issue facing the commission? How do you plan to address that? I consider the most important issue facing the commission is the economic disparity between African Americans and the majority population of Tulsa. I plan on addressing this issue by identifying the major factors that impact the economic differences of Tulsans and working with individuals and groups to implement workable strategies to improve economic conditions for African Americans.

What do you see as this commission’s potential? I see the Commission as having great potential, as the voice of the African-American community, to bring about positive change.

What do you consider to be the commission’s greatest strength? The commission’s greatest strength is the people we represent. The commission, as a collective, has a great desire to represent the African-American community to build stronger resources and relationships within and without the community.

At the six-month mark, what would you like to have the commission accomplish? To have a written out strategic plan with achievable goals.

How has the community responded to the commission? The response has been fantastic; the feedback I have received has been extremely enthusiastic and positive.

What do you want Tulsan’s to know about the commission? The commission seeks to help the African-American community fulfill its potential which will improve the city of Tulsa, overall.

What do you love about Tulsa? This is my home, where I am rooted, it is where everything I love most resides.

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Bill White, 48

Director of development, Greenwood Cultural Center

What’s the most important issue facing the commission? Moving the African-American community, as a whole, positively forward. In all honesty, I can’t say there is one issue that is more important than the other. Some of it depends on where you live, but I do see several reoccurring themes: police interaction, education, employment opportunities, few, if any, African Americans in decision making positions in the City, etc.

How do you plan to address that issue? I believe the 1968 Kerner Report is a great template for starters. The wheel does not need to be reinvented — maybe re-applied or used differently.

What do you see as this commission’s potential? Unlimited, if we focus on “all of Tulsa’s African-American Community” — not just north. But with that being said, if we get things right in north Tulsa, the other parts of the City will be much easier to fix and change.

What do you consider to be the commission’s greatest strength? The ability to spotlight changes that other cities have implemented years ago and see their positive results.

At the six-month mark, what would you like to have the commission accomplish? The ability to listen and allow the commission to hear the community.

How has the community responded to the commission? The community has been engaged and I look forward to us addressing “real issues” and not just being professional Tulsa “Talkers.”

What do you want Tulsans to know about the commission? The work that the commission does and will do is to make Tulsa and its citizens better. We want citizen engagement and not just when there are “Hot” issues.

What do you love about Tulsa? Tulsa has history.

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Carlisha Williams, 33

Executive director, Tulsa Legacy Charter School

What’s the most important issue facing the commission? How do you plan to address that? There are many topics of pressing concern for African Americans in the city of Tulsa, such as education, criminal justice, economic development, health care and more. The intersectionality of these issues makes it difficult to place one area of focus above the other. There are systemic changes that must be made for the African-American community to progress in our city. The Commission is a vehicle to strategize, organize and advocate on behalf of our community.

What do you see as this commission’s potential? I see the potential of the commission to be an instrumental group of leaders who identifies needs, strategizes, organizes and advocates to advance the African-American community in the city of Tulsa.

What do you consider to be the commission’s greatest strength? The diverse backgrounds, experiences, and perspectives on the commission. It is an honor to be a part of a team of dynamic leaders with a passion to serve our city.

At the six-month mark, what would you like to have the commission accomplish? Our commission has a lot of foundational work to do as we are just getting started. However, at the six-month mark, I would like for the commission to have identified our target areas of focus and built community committees meeting to build aspects of our strategic plan for solutions and community supports.

What do you want Tulsans to know about the commission? We want the community to be engaged with the commission by attending our meetings, joining our committees, providing feedback and ideas. The commission desires to do this work alongside our community. We are here to serve and represent the needs of the community.

What do you love about Tulsa? I love the opportunities our city provides to young professionals looking to make and be a part of positive change.

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Kristi Williams, 42

Health care billing specialist and political consultant; representative for the Tulsa African Ancestral Society; commission vice chairwoman

What’s the most important issue facing the commission? How do you plan to address that? The most important issue facing the commission is building viable sustainable communities for African Americans throughout Tulsa. How do we do that? We do that through addressing financial literacy, correcting the system of unequal justice, fostering accountable community-center policing, creating adequate and affordable neighborhoods, access to well-paying jobs, economic prosperity and access to health care and well-being. Addressing all of those will birth viable sustainable communities.

What do you see as this commission’s potential? The commission has a great potential to enlighten and empower African Americans throughout Tulsa by reintroducing our rich history and culture through shared values and principles that we lost in between generations.

What do you consider to be the commission’s greatest strength? The commission’s greatest strength is organization.

At the six-month mark, what would you like to have the commission accomplish? Being that we are a new commission who just completed our bylaws in March, we are now beginning to structure our strategic plan. We are just getting started but I would like for the commission to have accomplished creating a sense of unity among African Americans in this city.

How has the community responded to the commission? So far, I believe the community has responded well to the commission but yet skeptical of how we can positively impact the lives of African Americans throughout this city based on their experiences of being disfranchised and oppressed. They are also looking to see how our Mayor will work with this commission.

What do you want Tulsans to know about the commission? In the words of Dr. King, “the line of progress is never straight.” I want Tulsans to know that this commission is 50-60 years behind and it will take time to catch up to the work that other commissions has done in the communities they serve. However, we will be dedicated and diligent on creating solutions to the problems that affects us as a people. Once we can solve problems that we as African Americans face, it creates a better Tulsa for us all.

What do you love about Tulsa? What I love about Tulsa is that it has one of the most elaborate detailed blueprint for success and turning pain into purpose, “Black Wall Street and Greenwood.” When we talk about Black Wall Street and Greenwood most of us think of the Massacre of 1921. We totally miss how it thrived before the massacre and how Black Wall Street and Greenwood was rebuilt after the Massacre. The spirit of those ancestors are so strong here. The road has been paved, a blank canvas exists for us not only to create our own success but to be the reality of those ancestors dreams. I absolutely love that.

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October 2018

We’re serving up our new chef-inspired fondue and traditional brunch options like Alpine Benedict Cheese Fondue, French Toast Fondue, Avocado Fiesta Toast plus bottomless mimosas. Reserve...

Cost: Varies

Where:
The Melting Pot of Tulsa
300 Riverwalk Terrace #190
Jenks, OK  74037
View map »


Sponsor: The Melting Pot of Tulsa
Telephone: 918-299-8000
Contact Name: Alex Cooper
Website »

More information

FlyingTee is fun for the whole family and on Sundays, kids eat free! *Limit one free meal from the kids’ menu with each purchase of an adult entrée. Not valid on brunches or holidays.

Cost: Free with purchase

Where:
FlyingTee
600 Riverwalk Terrace
Jenks, OK  74037
View map »


Telephone: 918-528-7717
Website »

More information

Temple Israel would like to invite everyone to SHALOMFEST 2018. ShalomFest will take place at Temple Israel on October 14th from 12:00pm-4:00pm. This is our 25th annual celebration of Jewish...

Cost: Free & open the public

Where:
Temple Israel
2004 E 22nd Pl
Tulsa, OK  74114
View map »


Sponsor: Temple Israel
Telephone: (918) 747-1309
Contact Name: Sam Kirzner
Website »

More information

Join Thread Talk at West Elm on Sunday, October 14 for a special pop-up event from 12 to 4 p.m. Thread Talk provides comfort to its customers while making an impact across the U.S. For every...

Cost: Free

Where:
West Elm
1926 Utica Square, Tulsa, OK 74114
Tulsa, OK  74114
View map »


Sponsor: https://threadtalk.com/
Website »

More information

Stroll the streets and tour some of the iconic homes and gardens of the Maple Ridge Neighborhood!  Join us for our 20th year and don't miss the antique cars, refreshments, raffle prizes and Beer...

Cost: Prepaid Tickets $15.00

Where:
1615 S. Owasso Ave.
4012 S Yorktown Ave
Tulsa, OK  74120
View map »


Sponsor: Maple Ridge Neighborhood Association
Telephone: 918-645-3918
Contact Name: Marlene Martindale
Website »

More information

Tulsa Boys’ Centennial Homecoming will be held on October 14, 2018 from 2:00pm-6:00pm, 2727 S. 137th W. Ave., Sand Springs OK, 74063.

Cost: free

Where:
Tulsa Boys' Home
2727 S. 137th W. Ave.
Sand Springs, OK  74063
View map »

More information

Orth Contemporary is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new Silver Deposit paintings by Jimi Gleason on view at the gallery from September 7ththrough October 19th.    ...

Cost: free

Where:
Orth Contemporary
20 South Lewis Avenue
Tulsa, OK  74104
View map »


Telephone: (918) 565-9404
Contact Name: Katie
Website »

More information

Orth Contemporary is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new Silver Deposit paintings by Jimi Gleason on view at the gallery from September 7ththrough October 19th.    ...

Cost: free

Where:
Orth Contemporary
20 South Lewis Avenue
Tulsa, OK  74104
View map »


Telephone: (918) 565-9404
Contact Name: Katie
Website »

More information

The Fear Factory is Tulsa's newest haunted attraction.

Cost: $20

Where:
Tulsa, OK  74115


Sponsor: 75 Productions
Telephone: 918-947-9544
Website »

More information

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Luncheon honoring our Employee of the Year, Achiever of the Year, Graduate of the Year, and Community Partner.

Cost: none

Where:
Southern Hills Marriott Hotel
1902 E. 71st St
Tulsa, OK
View map »

More information

Think you can't do something, like sculpt, build a robot, or make a stamp? Think again! Come enjoy our 45-minute workshops held every Monday at noon at the McKeon Center for Creativity....

Cost: free and open to the public

Where:
McKeon Center for Creativity
910 S. Boston Ave.
TCC Metro Campus
Tulsa, OK  74119
View map »


Sponsor: McKeon Center for Creativity
Telephone: 918-595-7339
Contact Name: McKeon Center for Creativity
Website »

More information

Speaker name: Miriam Moreno-Diaz, RN, MPH, CCP Speaker title: Quality Improvement Specialist, Oklahoma Health Initiatives Presentation title: “Matters of the Heart”...

Cost: Free

Where:
Central Library-Pocahontas Greadington Center
400 Civic Center
Tulsa, OK  74103
View map »

More information

Orth Contemporary is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new Silver Deposit paintings by Jimi Gleason on view at the gallery from September 7ththrough October 19th.    ...

Cost: free

Where:
Orth Contemporary
20 South Lewis Avenue
Tulsa, OK  74104
View map »


Telephone: (918) 565-9404
Contact Name: Katie
Website »

More information

Orth Contemporary is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new Silver Deposit paintings by Jimi Gleason on view at the gallery from September 7ththrough October 19th.    ...

Cost: free

Where:
Orth Contemporary
20 South Lewis Avenue
Tulsa, OK  74104
View map »


Telephone: (918) 565-9404
Contact Name: Katie
Website »

More information

Show More...
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Featuring Jessica Zitter, MD, Critical and Palliative Care Specialist and author focused on finding a better path to the end of life. The evening will include a viewing of the Academy Award...

Cost: free

Where:
Hard Rock Casino & Hotel
777 W Cherokee
Catoosa, OK  74015
View map »


Sponsor: Clarehouse
Telephone: 918-893-6150
Contact Name: Britni Smith
Website »

More information

Orth Contemporary is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new Silver Deposit paintings by Jimi Gleason on view at the gallery from September 7ththrough October 19th.    ...

Cost: free

Where:
Orth Contemporary
20 South Lewis Avenue
Tulsa, OK  74104
View map »


Telephone: (918) 565-9404
Contact Name: Katie
Website »

More information

Orth Contemporary is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new Silver Deposit paintings by Jimi Gleason on view at the gallery from September 7ththrough October 19th.    ...

Cost: free

Where:
Orth Contemporary
20 South Lewis Avenue
Tulsa, OK  74104
View map »


Telephone: (918) 565-9404
Contact Name: Katie
Website »

More information

Show More...
Show Less...

Orth Contemporary is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new Silver Deposit paintings by Jimi Gleason on view at the gallery from September 7ththrough October 19th.    ...

Cost: free

Where:
Orth Contemporary
20 South Lewis Avenue
Tulsa, OK  74104
View map »


Telephone: (918) 565-9404
Contact Name: Katie
Website »

More information

Orth Contemporary is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new Silver Deposit paintings by Jimi Gleason on view at the gallery from September 7ththrough October 19th.    ...

Cost: free

Where:
Orth Contemporary
20 South Lewis Avenue
Tulsa, OK  74104
View map »


Telephone: (918) 565-9404
Contact Name: Katie
Website »

More information

Song, music and dance from the tradition of the semi-nomadic traveling musicians from Rajasthan, India

Cost: 0

Where:
Gathering Place Tulsa, QuikTrip Great Lawn
Tulsa, OK


Sponsor: SAPAF with GKFF
Telephone: 918 665 6419
Contact Name: Mohan Kelkar
Website »

More information

Join us for an evening of discussion with award-winning mystery author Sara Paretsky as she discusses the latest book in her acclaimed V.I. Warshawski series, "Shell Game." A book signing...

Cost: Free

Where:
Central Library
civic center
Tulsa, OK  74103
View map »


Sponsor: Tulsa City-County Library
Contact Name: Rebecca H

More information

Show More...
Show Less...

Mothers of Preschoolers (and preschool means prior to school, ages 6 weeks to 5 years old). MOPS warmly welcomes any mom that has at least one child age 6 weeks to 5 years old. By joining MOPS, you...

Cost: Free

Where:
Eastwood Baptist Church
948 S 91st E Ave
Tulsa, OK  74112
View map »


Sponsor: Eastwood Baptist Church
Telephone: 918-836-8686
Contact Name: Shirley Pittenger
Website »

More information

Come prepared to interview with dozens of actively hiring companies representing a variety of career fields and industries. Use a workstation for online job applications. Connect with...

Cost: Free to attend

Where:
Edgar J. Helms Center
2740 Southwest Boulevard
Tulsa, OK  74107
View map »


Sponsor: Goodwill Industries of Tulsa
Telephone: 918-599-0067
Contact Name: Clarice Floyd
Website »

More information

This six-week cooking demonstration series will help you learn to shop smarter and use nutrition information to make healthier choices and make delicious and affordable meals. Each Cooking Matters...

Cost: Free

Where:
Friendship Church
1709 N. Madison Ave,
Tulsa, OK
View map »


Sponsor: LIFE Senior Services
Telephone: (918) 664-9000
Contact Name: Emily Fox

More information

Fish, fun, friends and stories! Join us for our own seaside story time. Ages 2-5, maximum of 35, available on a first come basis. Free with admission to the Aquarium.

Cost: Children under 3 FREE Kids (3-12) $11.95 Adults $15.95

Where:
Oklahoma Aquarium
300 Aquarium Drive
Jenks, OK  74037
View map »


Telephone: 918-296-FISH
Contact Name: Ann Money
Website »

More information

Are you staying in town for Fall Break? The Melting Pot is offering an extended weekend-long family special with kid-friendly fondue for the whole family.

Cost: $29.95 per adult | $19.95 per child

Where:
The Melting Pot of Tulsa
300 Riverwalk Terrace #190
Jenks, OK  74037
View map »


Sponsor: The Melting Pot of Tulsa
Telephone: 918-299-8000
Contact Name: Alex Cooper
Website »

More information

Orth Contemporary is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new Silver Deposit paintings by Jimi Gleason on view at the gallery from September 7ththrough October 19th.    ...

Cost: free

Where:
Orth Contemporary
20 South Lewis Avenue
Tulsa, OK  74104
View map »


Telephone: (918) 565-9404
Contact Name: Katie
Website »

More information

Orth Contemporary is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new Silver Deposit paintings by Jimi Gleason on view at the gallery from September 7ththrough October 19th.    ...

Cost: free

Where:
Orth Contemporary
20 South Lewis Avenue
Tulsa, OK  74104
View map »


Telephone: (918) 565-9404
Contact Name: Katie
Website »

More information

Willkommen to four days of Oompah (or Bavaria or Oktoberfest) in Oklahoma with nationally-known German bands, authentic European foods, arts and crafters MarktHaus, full carnival and fun...

Cost: $10

Where:
River West Festival Park
2100 S. Jackson Ave.
Tulsa, OK  74107
View map »


Sponsor: Linde
Telephone: 918-596-2007
Contact Name: Tonja Carrigg
Website »

More information

Baptist Village of Owasso presents our annual Family Fun Fest, Thursday, October 18, 2018 from 5 to 7 pm. There will be free hot dogs, drinks, and popsicles! This event is for people of all ages,...

Cost: Free

Where:
Baptist Village of Owasso
7410 N. 127th E. Ave
Owasso, OK  74055
View map »

More information

Tulsa Metro Sound invites you to visit our weekly rehearsals - to be introduced to the women's All American craft of a cappella singing. We meet every Thursday evening at Christ Church Episcopal,...

Cost: 0

Where:
Christ Church Episcopal
10901 S Yale Ave
Tulsa, OK
View map »


Sponsor: Tulsa Metro Sound
Telephone: 918-352-6091
Contact Name: Candace
Website »

More information

A fun Indian take on Jane Austen's famous novel with all the charms of Indian dance and music

Cost: 0

Where:
Guthrie Green
Tulsa, OK


Sponsor: SAPAF with GKFF
Telephone: 918 665 6419
Contact Name: Mohan Kelkar
Website »

More information

Third Thursdays in the Rainbow Room returns October 18 with Tulsa icon Rebecca Ungerman performing her one-woman show, "Oy, Gestalt!" “Oy, Gestalt” is a rollicking look at...

Cost: $10 and $15

Where:
Lynn Riggs BlackBox Theatre - OkEq
621 East 4th Street
Tulsa, OK  74120
View map »


Sponsor: OkEq
Telephone: 918-637-2866
Contact Name: Pat Hobbs
Website »

More information

TU Theatre presents Man of La Mancha on October 18-20 and October 25-27 at 8pm. October 21 at 2pm,

Cost: 10.00

Where:
Kendall Hall
3102 E 4th Place
Tulsa, OK  74104
View map »

More information

Show More...
Show Less...

The Arabian Horse Association is headed back to Tulsa, Okla. for the 2018 U.S. National Arabian and Half-Arabian Championship Horse Show from October 19-27. Join us for exciting new events,...

Cost: Free

Where:
Expo Square
4145 East 21st Street
Tulsa
Tulsa, OK  74114
View map »


Sponsor: Arabian Horse Association
Telephone: 303-696-4500
Contact Name: Kelsey Bergland
Website »

More information

Are you staying in town for Fall Break? The Melting Pot is offering an extended weekend-long family special with kid-friendly fondue for the whole family.

Cost: $29.95 per adult | $19.95 per child

Where:
The Melting Pot of Tulsa
300 Riverwalk Terrace #190
Jenks, OK  74037
View map »


Sponsor: The Melting Pot of Tulsa
Telephone: 918-299-8000
Contact Name: Alex Cooper
Website »

More information

Orth Contemporary is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new Silver Deposit paintings by Jimi Gleason on view at the gallery from September 7ththrough October 19th.    ...

Cost: free

Where:
Orth Contemporary
20 South Lewis Avenue
Tulsa, OK  74104
View map »


Telephone: (918) 565-9404
Contact Name: Katie
Website »

More information

Orth Contemporary is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new Silver Deposit paintings by Jimi Gleason on view at the gallery from September 7ththrough October 19th.    ...

Cost: free

Where:
Orth Contemporary
20 South Lewis Avenue
Tulsa, OK  74104
View map »


Telephone: (918) 565-9404
Contact Name: Katie
Website »

More information

Willkommen to four days of Oompah (or Bavaria or Oktoberfest) in Oklahoma with nationally-known German bands, authentic European foods, arts and crafters MarktHaus, full carnival and fun...

Cost: $10

Where:
River West Festival Park
2100 S. Jackson Ave.
Tulsa, OK  74107
View map »


Sponsor: Linde
Telephone: 918-596-2007
Contact Name: Tonja Carrigg
Website »

More information

Nimrod Journal and Booksmart Tulsa will host Write Night 2018 at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, October 19th, at the Tulsa Garden Center. Write Night will feature a reception and Author Chat with poet...

Cost: Free

Where:
The Tulsa Garden Center
2435 S. Peoria Ave.
Tulsa, OK  74114
View map »


Sponsor: Nimrod Journal
Telephone: 918-631-3080
Contact Name: Eilis O'Neal
Website »

More information

The Nimrod Conference for Readers and Writers begins with Write Night on Friday, October 19th, at the Tulsa Garden Center at 6:30 p.m. Write Night is free and open to the public and will begin...

Cost: Free

Where:
Tulsa Garden Center
2435 S. Peoria Ave.
Tulsa, OK  74114
View map »


Sponsor: Nimrod Journal
Telephone: 918-704-7006
Contact Name: Cassidy McCants
Website »

More information

Nimrod Journal and Booksmart Tulsa will host Write Night 2018 at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, October 19th, at the Tulsa Garden Center. Write Night will feature a reception and Author Chat with poet...

Cost: Free

Where:
The Tulsa Garden Center
2435 S. Peoria Ave.
Tulsa, OK  74114
View map »


Sponsor: Nimrod Journal
Telephone: 918-631-3080
Contact Name: Eilis O'Neal
Website »

More information

The Fear Factory is Tulsa's newest haunted attraction.

Cost: $20

Where:
Tulsa, OK  74115


Sponsor: 75 Productions
Telephone: 918-947-9544
Website »

More information

THERE IS MORE TOUR brings falls dates to the U.S. featuring music artists Hillsong Worship and teaching from Pastor Brian Houston.  Following the successful spring tour that filled to capacity...

Cost: $28.00 General, $40.00 Deluxe

Where:
Victory Church
7700 S. Lewis Ave.
Tulsa, OK  74136
View map »


Sponsor: Premier Productions
Telephone: 855-484-1991
Contact Name: Carol
Website »

More information

The two-timed Grammy Nominated, Stellar Award winning Walls Group, will be performing live on The Great Lawn Stage along with the MET Choir and Kirk Franklin. Hailing from Houston, TX, this...

Cost: 0.00

Where:
Great Lawn Stage
2650 S. John Williams Way East
Tulsa, OK  74114
View map »


Sponsor: Gathering Place

More information

Admission is FREE, and this is a fun event for the entire family. The event will have a DJ performing various traditional, Indian folk and modern Bollywood tunes, including energetic Dandiya...

Cost: 0

Where:
Guthrie Green
Tulsa, OK


Sponsor: SAPAF with GKFF
Telephone: 918 665 6419
Contact Name: Mohan Kelkar
Website »

More information

TU Theatre presents Man of La Mancha on October 18-20 and October 25-27 at 8pm. October 21 at 2pm,

Cost: 10.00

Where:
Kendall Hall
3102 E 4th Place
Tulsa, OK  74104
View map »

More information

Show More...
Show Less...

The Arabian Horse Association is headed back to Tulsa, Okla. for the 2018 U.S. National Arabian and Half-Arabian Championship Horse Show from October 19-27. Join us for exciting new events,...

Cost: Free

Where:
Expo Square
4145 East 21st Street
Tulsa
Tulsa, OK  74114
View map »


Sponsor: Arabian Horse Association
Telephone: 303-696-4500
Contact Name: Kelsey Bergland
Website »

More information

Tulsa's 11th annual Out of the Darkness Walk, benefiting the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.  Each year, suicide claims more lives than war, murder, and natural disasters...

Cost: Free, but must register at afsp.org/tulsa

Where:
Kendall-Whittier Park
2601-2633 S Columbia Ave
Tulsa, OK  74104
View map »


Sponsor: American Foundation for Suicide Prevention
Telephone: 539-777-0122
Contact Name: Robin Hudson LeBlanc
Website »

More information

Nimrod International Journal of Prose and Poetry will host its annual Conference for Readers and Writers at The University of Tulsa on October 20th, 2018. The Conference will begin at...

Cost: $60; scholarships available

Where:
TU's Allen Chapman Student Union
400 S. Gary Ave.
Tulsa, OK  74104
View map »


Sponsor: Nimrod Journal
Telephone: 918-631-3080
Contact Name: Cassidy McCants
Website »

More information

Nimrod Journal will host its annual Conference for Readers and Writers on Saturday, October 20th, at The University of Tulsa. The conference will feature workshops on fiction, poetry, memoir,...

Cost: $10-$70

Where:
University of Tulsa Allen Chapman Student Union
404 S. Gary Ave.
Tulsa, OK  74104
View map »


Sponsor: Nimrod Journal
Telephone: 918-631-3080
Contact Name: Eilis O'Neal
Website »

More information

We’re serving up our new chef-inspired fondue and traditional brunch options like Alpine Benedict Cheese Fondue, French Toast Fondue, Avocado Fiesta Toast plus bottomless mimosas. Reserve...

Cost: Varies

Where:
The Melting Pot of Tulsa
300 Riverwalk Terrace #190
Jenks, OK  74037
View map »


Sponsor: The Melting Pot of Tulsa
Telephone: 918-299-8000
Contact Name: Alex Cooper
Website »

More information

Are you staying in town for Fall Break? The Melting Pot is offering an extended weekend-long family special with kid-friendly fondue for the whole family.

Cost: $29.95 per adult | $19.95 per child

Where:
The Melting Pot of Tulsa
300 Riverwalk Terrace #190
Jenks, OK  74037
View map »


Sponsor: The Melting Pot of Tulsa
Telephone: 918-299-8000
Contact Name: Alex Cooper
Website »

More information

Willkommen to four days of Oompah (or Bavaria or Oktoberfest) in Oklahoma with nationally-known German bands, authentic European foods, arts and crafters MarktHaus, full carnival and fun...

Cost: $10

Where:
River West Festival Park
2100 S. Jackson Ave.
Tulsa, OK  74107
View map »


Sponsor: Linde
Telephone: 918-596-2007
Contact Name: Tonja Carrigg
Website »

More information

October 20th from 7 to 9 p.m. Oklahoma Performing Arts will host "A Night with Tolleck Winner" to benefit the OPA. The event, in coordination with the Atamian Gallery, will be the first...

Cost: Free

Where:
Oklahoma Performing Arts
718 South Elm Place
Broken Arrow, OK  74011-74014
View map »


Sponsor: Oklahoma Performing Arts & Atamian Gallery
Telephone: 310-254-7149
Contact Name: Jack Price
Website »

More information

America’s LARGEST interactive comedy murder mystery dinner show is now playing at the Hilton Garden Inn Tulsa Broken Arrow! At The Dinner Detective, you’ll tackle a challenging crime while you...

Cost: 59.95

Where:
Hilton Garden Inn Tulsa- Broken Arrow
420 W Albany St.
Broken Arrow, OK  74012
View map »


Telephone: 866-496-0535
Contact Name: The Dinner Detective
Website »

More information

Please join us for our annual event to celebrate and support the Little Blue House. We will have catering by Keo, a cash bar complete with signature cocktail, silent auction, and a dessert dash!...

Cost: $40-1000

Where:
East Side Christian Church
1438 S. Indianapolis Ave
Tulsa, OK  74112
View map »


Sponsor: Little Blue House
Telephone: 918-978-9721
Contact Name: Linda Davis
Website »

More information

The Oklahoma Swing Syndicate (TOSS) hosts a Swing dance and lessons  The Oklahoma Swing Syndicate (TOSS) is the only UNESCO recognized dance organization in Oklahoma.  We are a 501c3...

Cost: $7

Where:
Community Center - South Minister Presby Church
3500 So Peoria
1/2 west of Peoria, on 35pl behind the church
Tulsa, OK  74102
View map »


Sponsor: The Ok Swing Syndicate
Telephone: 918-450-691
Contact Name: Rita Robbins
Website »

More information

October 20th from 7 to 9 p.m. Oklahoma Performing Arts will host "A Night with Tolleck Winner" to benefit the OPA. The event, in coordination with the Atamian Gallery, will be the first...

Cost: Free

Where:
Oklahoma Performing Arts
718 South Elm Place
Broken Arrow, OK  74011-74014
View map »


Sponsor: Oklahoma Performing Arts & Atamian Gallery
Telephone: 310-254-7149
Contact Name: Jack Price
Website »

More information

The Fear Factory is Tulsa's newest haunted attraction.

Cost: $20

Where:
Tulsa, OK  74115


Sponsor: 75 Productions
Telephone: 918-947-9544
Website »

More information

The Mummy & Me dance is a Halloween dance for just the kids and mom. SORRY, NO DADS ALLOWED. We encourage everyone to come in a costume but not required. There will be a costume contest, scary...

Cost: $5.00 Per Person

Where:
Nienhuis Park Community Center
3201 North 9th Street
Broken Arrow, OK  74012
View map »


Telephone: 918-259-6550
Contact Name: Nienhuis Park Community Center

More information

Are you thirsting for some fun in October? If you're feeling drained, bring your boyfriend/ghoulfriend and join the other children of the night for a show that's so funny, it's spooky. 8:00 p.m.,...

Cost: $8.00 ($4.00 for children under 12)

Where:
pH Community House
306 South Phoenix Ave
Tulsa, OK  74127
View map »


Sponsor: Laughing Matter Improv
Contact Name: Jerry Henderson
Website »

More information

TU Theatre presents Man of La Mancha on October 18-20 and October 25-27 at 8pm. October 21 at 2pm,

Cost: 10.00

Where:
Kendall Hall
3102 E 4th Place
Tulsa, OK  74104
View map »

More information

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TULtalk


QUIZ: Which Oktoberfest Beer Are You?

Take our quiz to discover which of the many seasonal brews on tap at Oktoberfest, Oct. 18-21, best captures your personality!

Comments

Episode 6: Vanessa Hall-Harper, District 1 City Councilor

City Councilor Vanessa Hall-Harper gives us a debrief of why civilian oversight might be the next step to mend relations between community and police.

Comments

From the editor: Only in downtown

I’ve had so many “only in downtown Tulsa” moments.

Comments

An Insider's Guide To Downtown Tulsa

Experience downtown with these tips and tricks for navigating the districts — where to eat, get a drink, and find entertainment.

Comments

Charitable Events: October 2018

Our social calendar is jam-packed for the month of October! Which of these worthy causes will you support?

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